Around the yard

sockgirl77

New Member
My son and I were eating dinner on the deck while the power was out and talking. I had fabulous company and a great view. Then I see movement about 400 feet away, now I didn’t have my glasses on and without them I suffer from CSS with anything farther than 6 or 7 feet away.

Me: What is that?
Son: What?
Me: Over there…is it a squirrel?
Son: Where?
Me: Straight across the yard. It doesn’t move like a squirrel. I need my glasses, be right back.
*In unison* Me: …it’s a turtle. Son: It’s a turtle.
Me: I need my camera.
Son: I thought you were talking about the stick.
Me: :twitch::eyebrow:
*Walks over to the turtle...with the fearless hunter at our side*
Me: Ohhhh cool…
Son: It’s a snapping turtle…I didn’t know they had them here…
Me: Me either, check out those claws!
Fritz: *Sniff sniff* *WTH is that?*
Me: Get back Fritz, you don't want him to bite you.
Fritz: *Gets closer*
Me: *Smacks Fritz*
Fritz: *Jumps two feet in air and then stands behind me...:killingme
I don't know what I love more, the story with pics or the fact that you have a cat named FRITZ! :high5:
 

Independence

New Member
You are not the only one! I pretty much go googoo over any animal. But Lizards are my favorite.

I raised 300 tree frogs last year and released them at my creek.
Gray Tree Frog - Tree Frogs (Family Hylidae)- Discover Maryland's Herps - Wildlife and Heritage Service - Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Damn frogs kept skinny dipping in my pool and leaving eggs behind...

That looks like an Eastern Fence Lizard. I haven't seen any here yet. I used to catch them all the time in Florida. Fast lil buggers.

Awww poor toad!
It is an eastern fence lizard. If you want more trees frogs come on by. Our neighbor has an in-ground pool that hasn't been filled in the 10 years we've lived there. It's so noisy at his house at night I don't know how they sleep.

I love our wildlife too. Can't believe I was a city girl growing up!!
 

Roman

Active Member
My son and I were eating dinner on the deck while the power was out and talking. I had fabulous company and a great view. Then I see movement about 400 feet away, now I didn’t have my glasses on and without them I suffer from CSS with anything farther than 6 or 7 feet away.

Me: What is that?
Son: What?
Me: Over there…is it a squirrel?
Son: Where?
Me: Straight across the yard. It doesn’t move like a squirrel. I need my glasses, be right back.
*In unison* Me: …it’s a turtle. Son: It’s a turtle.
Me: I need my camera.
Son: I thought you were talking about the stick.
Me: :twitch::eyebrow:
*Walks over to the turtle...with the fearless hunter at our side*
Me: Ohhhh cool…
Son: It’s a snapping turtle…I didn’t know they had them here…
Me: Me either, check out those claws!
Fritz: *Sniff sniff* *WTH is that?*
Me: Get back Fritz, you don't want him to bite you.
Fritz: *Gets closer*
Me: *Smacks Fritz*
Fritz: *Jumps two feet in air and then stands behind me...:killingme
It looks like a Snapping Turtle, but I think it might be a Musk Turtle. Don't Snappers have ridges on their backs, and they are black & gray? Whatever he is, he's sure cute!
 

ZARA

Registered User
It looks like a Snapping Turtle, but I think it might be a Musk Turtle. Don't Snappers have ridges on their backs, and they are black & gray? Whatever he is, he's sure cute!

Musk Turtle: (Small, 2 - 5 in, stripe on side of head)
Species Profile: Common Musk Turtle (Sternotherus odoratus) | SREL Herpetology

Snapping turtle: (8 - 14 inches. Record - 19 inches)
Eastern Snapping Turtle - Field Guide to Maryland's Turtles (Order Testudines)- Discover Maryland's Herps - Wildlife and Heritage Service - Maryland Department of Natural Resources

I think you are thinking of an Alligator Snapping Turtle:
Alligator Snapping Turtles, Alligator Snapping Turtle Pictures, Alligator Snapping Turtle Facts - National Geographic
 

RareBreed

Throwing the deuces
Bunny in our backyard this morning. Looks like it's gathering grass. Maybe making a nest somewhere???
Boys and I went out to investigate and there is a nest being made. Any ideas on how to protect it from being stepped on since it's in our yard and we go back there often? Any idea how long the nests are so we know where not to step?
 

Roman

Active Member
Boys and I went out to investigate and there is a nest being made. Any ideas on how to protect it from being stepped on since it's in our yard and we go back there often? Any idea how long the nests are so we know where not to step?
I haven't a clue about your nest question, but what a beautiful yard!
 

RareBreed

Throwing the deuces
I haven't a clue about your nest question, but what a beautiful yard!
Long grass and all!! Our oldest just mowed so hopefully he didn't disturb anything. There are actually two openings several feet apart. I guess the rabbit wants different escape route. Unfortunately, we haven't seen the rabbit since we discovered the holes so hopefully we didn't scare her away. I really want to see some baby bunnies!!
 

RareBreed

Throwing the deuces
Momma is back. I was getting worried because we hadn't seen her since this morning. I thought maybe we scared her off by discovering her nest. She is redigging one of the openings that collapsed a little from mowing. There is a bird and a squirrel a few feet from her and everyone is going about their business. I have seen squirrels and rabbits fight in our yard before.
 

RareBreed

Throwing the deuces
Momma is back. I was getting worried because we hadn't seen her since this morning. I thought maybe we scared her off by discovering her nest. She is redigging one of the openings that collapsed a little from mowing. There is a bird and a squirrel a few feet from her and everyone is going about their business. I have seen squirrels and rabbits fight in our yard before.
Momma is gone. I haven't seen her since Saturday night. :ohwell: Either she got hit by a car or decided our yard wasn't the ideal place to have her babies.
 

belvak

Happy Camper
Some more to share

(Eastern worm snake)

He was lucky Hubs didn't cut him in half while digging holes for our trees. Destroyed his home but at least he survived.
The fourth pic where you're holding your hand up and the :jameo: SNAKE :jameo: is crawling through your fingers is a really neat shot! We've got lizards, snakes, frogs, bunnies, deer, etc. all hanging out in our yard. They don't bother me unless they get inside! Well, except the snakes. They bother me a lot!!! :lol:
 

ZARA

Registered User
The fourth pic where you're holding your hand up and the :jameo: SNAKE :jameo: is crawling through your fingers is a really neat shot! We've got lizards, snakes, frogs, bunnies, deer, etc. all hanging out in our yard. They don't bother me unless they get inside! Well, except the snakes. They bother me a lot!!! :lol:
Thanks! Sometimes I get some great shots with my POS camera. But I usually end up taking about 30 to 50 pics before I get any that are quality. And that lil snake did not want to cooperate with me at all.

Snakes are easy to handle if you keep in mind a few important facts.

There are only 2 types of venomous snakes in Maryland, the copperhead and timber rattlesnake. Both have very distinctive features that make them easily identifiable.
1. Both have strong triangular/heart shaped heads.
2. Copperheads are copperish/orangish/tannish in coloring and have triangular marking along their bodies. Their bodies have sleek smooth scaling without protrusions.
3. Timber rattlesnakes range in color from a bright yellow to a dull gray with brown or black stripes down its body. The scaling on their body is slightly elevated and not smooth. And the most noticeable feature is its rattle. If you hear it, stop moving, take a GOOD look around and locate it. Do not ever run because you can easily run right into without even realizing it. *If you do see one, very slowly back away in the opposite direction and once you have about 10 ft distance or more...walk quickly.* According to the State website they are not located down here where we are.

So, if you see a snake that is not the two listed above, you are safe. Most snakes are terrified of you and they just want to get away.

Field Guide to Maryland's Snakes (Order Squamata)- Discover Maryland's Herps - Wildlife and Heritage Service - Maryland Department of Natural Resources
 

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