Henkles....Annapolis Junction

scole055

New Member
More Ft. Meade memories from the late 60's....maybe the best one of all; Henkels Ham Sandwiches. I know the place is no longer there but I managed to keep a few pictures and a couple of full sized menus. Also a few of the small pocket-sized menus too. If you happen to have pictures or other stuff from Henkels .....I would like to share.
 

RPMDAD

Well-Known Member
More Ft. Meade memories from the late 60's....maybe the best one of all; Henkels Ham Sandwiches. I know the place is no longer there but I managed to keep a few pictures and a couple of full sized menus. Also a few of the small pocket-sized menus too. If you happen to have pictures or other stuff from Henkels .....I would like to share.

Have no pictures or menues but ate there many times and to quote one of my favorite food guys on tv oh my goodness oh my goodness those sandwiches were fantastic and so large even though i am a big guy i got at least 2 or 3 meals out of them. Wow hadn't thought of that name in a long time. I am sure most people on here don't recognize the name at all, but i remember it well, it was awsome, i am sure this doesn't help you but did find this. Those were the good old days...... and i do remember the trains and tracks.....

Henkel's Restaurant - The Very End

[By Pat Stakem - April 16, 1999] . . .

Henkel's Restaurant, a landmark in Annapolis Junction, Maryland, for decades, closed its doors in early November of 1997. Right by the tracks of the B&O Washington Branch line, and across from the gravel plant, Henkel's was a favorite lunch spot for railfans and normal people alike. A major clientele was the lunchtime crowd from nearby Fort Meade. It was known to CSX engineers, truck drivers, and railfans across the country. However, business had been in a decline, and the decision was made by the owners to close up shop. Another homey, friendly eatery bites the dust!

Henkel's Restaurant did not advertise, and you would not accidentally trip across it. If you learned about Henkel's, you were told about its massive sandwiches by someone who had already been there. While you were eating inside, there was no question about when the train passed. Trains rocked the old wooden building for a century.

Milton Henkel had founded the restaurant in the 1930's as a gas station/pool hall/notary/grocery store/beer store and hangout. Back then, beer was 10 cents, the sandwiches were 35 cents. The restaurant was most recently owned by the Duggan family.

Although Annapolis Junction, just south of Route 32 on Brock Bridge Road, is best known for Henkel's Restaurant, it is also the site of Wimpey Minerals, recently renamed "Tarmac." That site receives a rock train from quarries near York, Pennsylvania, several times a week, usually with two 6-axle CSX units. The facility has a blue, ex-Conrail U23B. There was also an old Alco parked in front of Henkel's that belonged to a previous owner of the stone works. It was scrapped in place recently, a profoundly distressing process to watch. Tarmac receives dry bulk gondolas of cement. Just south of the facility is a lumberyard with a rail siding as well. Adjacent is the MARC Savage commuter rail station. On the line between Baltimore and Washington, the tracks see a constant stream of heavy haul, including autoracks for the ramp in Jessup just to the north, the Emerald Express trash train from the transfer facility, and the multi-weekly Tropicana cars.

Annapolis Junction got its name from the location where the Annapolis & Elk Ridge Railroad branched off the B&O eastward through Fort Meade, to the Chesapeake Bay.

The restaurant was burned to the ground in a training exercise for firemen on Wednesday, April 14, 1999. The structure consisted of old, dry wood, and went up like a torch. All that remains now are some radiators, and, surprisingly, the doorframe.
 

bcp

In My Opinion
Have no pictures or menues but ate there many times and to quote one of my favorite food guys on tv oh my goodness oh my goodness those sandwiches were fantastic and so large even though i am a big guy i got at least 2 or 3 meals out of them. Wow hadn't thought of that name in a long time. I am sure most people on here don't recognize the name at all, but i remember it well, it was awsome, .
I grew up on the ham sandwiches. My father worked for NSA (38 years), back in those days NSA workers either did lunch at Hinkles, or at the 602 (refered to by them as the Six Oh Duce)
We used to go to the figure 8 in Ellicott City (I think thats were it was) on Saturday nights in the summer and would stop off at Hinkles on the way and get the sandwich.

Never got to go to the 602 until I was 18, but at that time it had turned disco and basically,, what was the sense in going?
 

jaksprat

Member
I went with co-workers a few times in the late 70's/early 80's for lunch. I'll never forget those humongous sandwiches. I believe I had the ham thru the garden also which meant with lettuce, tomato and mayo. If I remember right, you could also get roast beef and turkey as well, equally massive in size. I'll never forget the size of those things. Must have been 2" to 3" of meat stacked high and overflowing on a big bun. They were just too big to bite down on from top to bottom. It would be great to see a pic if anyone has one.
 

mdff21

Active Member
WOW, that brings back some good memories. Yes, you could get the Ham, Roast Beef or Turkey plain or through the Garden which was the lettuce tomatoe and mayo. Had to be about a pound of meat or better on them thinly sliced and piled high. Definately not a five star rating for atmosphere, but the food a ten star. Building shook when the train went by.
 

scole055

New Member
Ham through the garden...Lordy yes!

No one could have had one of those ham sandwiches and forgot it....thin sliced ham...so thin you could almost see through it....hard old wooden booths, the bar and the "train shake". My group of NSA military friends and I celebrated most of our big moments there....marriages, children, and of course discharge from the hated service which, ironically, gave us some of our most beloved memories. Can't forget the ham sandwich, can't forget the laughter and the memories....still brings a smile 41 years later. Thanks for the info and the input...glad I'm not the only one with good memories of the old place. steve coleman...Henkels class of 1970.


Have no pictures or menues but ate there many times and to quote one of my favorite food guys on tv oh my goodness oh my goodness those sandwiches were fantastic and so large even though i am a big guy i got at least 2 or 3 meals out of them. Wow hadn't thought of that name in a long time. I am sure most people on here don't recognize the name at all, but i remember it well, it was awsome, i am sure this doesn't help you but did find this. Those were the good old days...... and i do remember the trains and tracks.....

Henkel's Restaurant - The Very End

[By Pat Stakem - April 16, 1999] . . .

Henkel's Restaurant, a landmark in Annapolis Junction, Maryland, for decades, closed its doors in early November of 1997. Right by the tracks of the B&O Washington Branch line, and across from the gravel plant, Henkel's was a favorite lunch spot for railfans and normal people alike. A major clientele was the lunchtime crowd from nearby Fort Meade. It was known to CSX engineers, truck drivers, and railfans across the country. However, business had been in a decline, and the decision was made by the owners to close up shop. Another homey, friendly eatery bites the dust!

Henkel's Restaurant did not advertise, and you would not accidentally trip across it. If you learned about Henkel's, you were told about its massive sandwiches by someone who had already been there. While you were eating inside, there was no question about when the train passed. Trains rocked the old wooden building for a century.

Milton Henkel had founded the restaurant in the 1930's as a gas station/pool hall/notary/grocery store/beer store and hangout. Back then, beer was 10 cents, the sandwiches were 35 cents. The restaurant was most recently owned by the Duggan family.

Although Annapolis Junction, just south of Route 32 on Brock Bridge Road, is best known for Henkel's Restaurant, it is also the site of Wimpey Minerals, recently renamed "Tarmac." That site receives a rock train from quarries near York, Pennsylvania, several times a week, usually with two 6-axle CSX units. The facility has a blue, ex-Conrail U23B. There was also an old Alco parked in front of Henkel's that belonged to a previous owner of the stone works. It was scrapped in place recently, a profoundly distressing process to watch. Tarmac receives dry bulk gondolas of cement. Just south of the facility is a lumberyard with a rail siding as well. Adjacent is the MARC Savage commuter rail station. On the line between Baltimore and Washington, the tracks see a constant stream of heavy haul, including autoracks for the ramp in Jessup just to the north, the Emerald Express trash train from the transfer facility, and the multi-weekly Tropicana cars.

Annapolis Junction got its name from the location where the Annapolis & Elk Ridge Railroad branched off the B&O eastward through Fort Meade, to the Chesapeake Bay.

The restaurant was burned to the ground in a training exercise for firemen on Wednesday, April 14, 1999. The structure consisted of old, dry wood, and went up like a torch. All that remains now are some radiators, and, surprisingly, the doorframe.
 

sontafranklin

New Member
Henkles & Annapolis Junction, MD

Hi... sorry no pics and researching, looking for pics and history, when I ran across this posting. Henkels is at top of the list and I can not find a thing. Ham sandwich through the garden was often shared in our household growing up. I remember the pictures of a train wreck on the wall. Also remember when post office was right next to Henkels.

I started a FaceBook group for collection all things related to history of 'Annapolis Junction, MD 20701' and invite anyone to contribute. I have pretty much exhausted the internet findings. Hopefully someone will have pics to share soon of Henkels and other things like of the old neighborhood, houses, structures, families, stories will be neat too.

SF
 

awpitt

Main Streeter
I have vague memories of Henkles and the 602. Mostly because of my Dad who worked at the NSA. I went to Brock Bridge Elementery and lived in Maryland City until '73. I have more memories of the Bay n Surf restaurant that was on Rt 1 south of Laurel and the Shakey's Pizza that was at the Rt. 1 split in Laurel.
 

papoose

New Member
fries with gravy

My husband and I went there a few times when we lived in Laurel. That's the place we learned about french fries with gravy! yummy lol. Split a roast beef sandwich and the fries and leave not being able to move. Hubby said coldest beer around too.
 

scharri

New Member
If you remember Henkels.....

I will have a ham sandwich through the garden please.

Ham thru the garden also had onions on it. Also liked Hot Ham and Cheese.
If you guys remember Henkels and the Duece You probably remember my fave, Dixie Pig. In the guys backyard, my favorite table was the one under the swing set. The actually building had a dirt floor. Best pulled pork and ribs ever.
 
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Feinmess

New Member
I remember Henkles very well

Was stationed at Fort Meade 1984-1987 and recall many food related establishments, none more than Henkles. The sandwich meat between the two slices of bread must have been 2 inches thick, no lie. And "through the garden" meant a sandwich with lettuce and tomato. Oh that was a great, little off the beaten path deli. Other places I remember:
Bay n Surf in Laurel;
Chick and Ruths Delly in Annapolis;
Riordans in Annapolis;
Jerry's Subs, all over MD;
Phillips Seafood, everywhere in MD;
Lots of Navy guys used to frequent the 602, affectionately called "the Deuce" and another staple of the navy guys was "The Tackroom", a dive bar on 198 that had a dirt floor, lol. Ah those were the days.
 
Loved Henkles, yummy, through the garden yes:) would starve myself for several days prior to going and still couldn't finish a sandwich!
 

RPMDAD

Well-Known Member
Was stationed at Fort Meade 1984-1987 and recall many food related establishments, none more than Henkles. The sandwich meat between the two slices of bread must have been 2 inches thick, no lie. And "through the garden" meant a sandwich with lettuce and tomato. Oh that was a great, little off the beaten path deli. Other places I remember:
Bay n Surf in Laurel;
Chick and Ruths Delly in Annapolis;
Riordans in Annapolis;
Jerry's Subs, all over MD;
Phillips Seafood, everywhere in MD;
Lots of Navy guys used to frequent the 602, affectionately called "the Deuce" and another staple of the navy guys was "The Tackroom", a dive bar on 198 that had a dirt floor, lol. Ah those were the days.


Recognize them all. Brings back memories.
 

Catman2

Member
While I slaved away at the Starting Gate, my junkie wife hustled drinks at 602. Was there another shorter route to Henkles that put across the trax rather than the parking lot?
 

burkneet

New Member
Enjoyed their ham sandwich through the garden and beer MANY times with friends. Also played the sit-down Asteroids game. LOVED this place!
 

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