John McCain

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Actually, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend had been living in Maryland for eighteen years by the time she ran for governor in 2002.
You know, you're right. I'm wrong. I didn't realize that, back in 2002. I remember her with Glendening, but I assumed like most Kennedys, she was just cashing in on the name.
It's not as though she didn't say an enormous amount of tremendously stupid things - like Clinton, pretended to be a sports fan - of the Ravens - and had no idea what she
was talking about.

(You know what's funny? Easily half of the New Yorkers I know absolutely HATE the Yankees. My first roommate in college was a Mets fan, and would only bring up the Yankees
because they'd won so many World Series. But he had his own - insulting - words to the Yankee fight song).
 

awpitt

Main Streeter
You know, you're right. I'm wrong. I didn't realize that, back in 2002. I remember her with Glendening, but I assumed like most Kennedys, she was just cashing in on the name.
It's not as though she didn't say an enormous amount of tremendously stupid things - like Clinton, pretended to be a sports fan - of the Ravens - and had no idea what she
was talking about.

(You know what's funny? Easily half of the New Yorkers I know absolutely HATE the Yankees. My first roommate in college was a Mets fan, and would only bring up the Yankees
because they'd won so many World Series. But he had his own - insulting - words to the Yankee fight song).

Yea. I can imagine there's a big rivalry among New Yorkers between the Mets and the Yankees. As far as Kennedy-Townsend, she settled in Maryland because it's her husband's home state. She actually did most of her growing up in Northern Virginia because that's where her parents lived and were raising their kids. She was the oldest of eleven.
 

This_person

Well-Known Member
There are no other words. The Constitution requires that a senator be a resident of the state they represent. I understand your point with regards to "when elected" but there is no language that waives the residency requirement for any reason, including appointments to fill an uncompleted term.
I'm not trying to be pedantic, but if it says "when elected", doesn't that mean the requirement exists only for when elected, not any other time? What would change the "when elected" clause to "any time a person is nominated but never elected"?
 

This_person

Well-Known Member
And, that means the requirement exists for someone to be elected, not appointed.

Let me give you an example of what I mean: We know that the president and vice president must be from different states when elected, but if the vice president resigns, the president may appoint someone to fill the vacancy. There is not a single word in the 25th amendment, Section 2, about being from a different state.

US Constitution said:
The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves
US Constitution said:
Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.

So, can the VP-select be from the same state as the sitting president? Of course, there is nothing stopping it. Because, it is not the electors choosing, it is the president. It is a different process than the election.

Similarly, a senator must be from the state the senator is elected to fill. But, if the senator is not elected (but, rather, selected) there is not a single word of prohibition on who the governor of the state may select to fill the seat. Adding any such requirement would be unconstitutional.

Now, can the governor place that limitation upon the selection pool? Of course, nothing stops the governor from doing that. But, nothing forces the governor to do that, either.
 

awpitt

Main Streeter
I'm not trying to be pedantic, but if it says "when elected", doesn't that mean the requirement exists only for when elected, not any other time? What would change the "when elected" clause to "any time a person is nominated but never elected"?
I know where you're coming from and it's a valid question. I'm just interpreting the language as meaning that the residency requirement exists regardless of how the individual is chosen.
Some states fill a U.S. Senate vacancy at their next regularly-scheduled general election. While the other states require that a special election be called. There are four states that prohibit the governor from making an interim appointment, which means that the seat is vacant until the next election (regular/special) is held.
 

This_person

Well-Known Member
I know where you're coming from and it's a valid question. I'm just interpreting the language as meaning that the residency requirement exists regardless of how the individual is chosen.
Some states fill a U.S. Senate vacancy at their next regularly-scheduled general election. While the other states require that a special election be called. There are four states that prohibit the governor from making an interim appointment, which means that the seat is vacant until the next election (regular/special) is held.
Did you see my example to vrai?

I get what you are saying, but like my example with the Vice-President, the Senate has a different process for filling vacancies than elections.

US Constitution said:
When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, That the legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct.

When filling a vacancy, everything you described is legal and proper (constitutional). But, I do not see anything that restricts "the executive authority of such State" in to whom they may make temporary appointments.
 

awpitt

Main Streeter
Did you see my example to vrai?

I get what you are saying, but like my example with the Vice-President, the Senate has a different process for filling vacancies than elections.

When filling a vacancy, everything you described is legal and proper (constitutional). But, I do not see anything that restricts "the executive authority of such State" in to whom they may make temporary appointments.
Since the Constitution leave the process of filling a senate vacancy up to each state, I'm guessing that the residency requirement would be contained in state law. Each state is a little different. Like some allow the governor to appoint anyone regardless of party. Other states require the appointment to come from the same party as the person who vacated the office. All states require an election at some point.
 

Midnightrider

Well-Known Member
That is a lie and we've corrected you about 8 million times, so here you go - stuck on stupid.
Like I said, whatever you need to tell yourselves to sleep at night. We both know you voted for mccain, there is no Point in denying it, it just makes you all look even more retarded.
 

awpitt

Main Streeter
Did you see my example to vrai?

I get what you are saying, but like my example with the Vice-President, the Senate has a different process for filling vacancies than elections.

When filling a vacancy, everything you described is legal and proper (constitutional). But, I do not see anything that restricts "the executive authority of such State" in to whom they may make temporary appointments.
...and as far as filling the VPOTUS vacancy. I'm stuck on that one. I don't know if there'd be anything preventing the president from picking someone from their own state.
 

This_person

Well-Known Member
Since the Constitution leave the process of filling a senate vacancy up to each state, I'm guessing that the residency requirement would be contained in state law. Each state is a little different. Like some allow the governor to appoint anyone regardless of party. Other states require the appointment to come from the same party as the person who vacated the office. All states require an election at some point.
Ok, now if the STATE requires someone be a current resident of the state, I would 100% agree that the person must be, and that is perfectly in line with the constitution. :cheers:
 
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