Shrinkflation

my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
Patron
We stopped at McDonald's a while back (had gson with us), used the kiosk to order.

I don't know if they're trying to be transparent, or are proud of the fact, but they print on the menu that their burgers are 1/10th pound.
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
We stopped at McDonald's a while back (had gson with us), used the kiosk to order.

I don't know if they're trying to be transparent, or are proud of the fact, but they print on the menu that their burgers are 1/10th pound.
Sounds about right, it's literally like a buck. You can buy a McDouble with cheese for like $2.50 (which would be 2/10s or almost a quarter pounder for half the price of a quarter pounder).

I don't eat McDonalds except once or twice a year, and I don't think I have had a regular single patty burger from them since they were selling for $0.29 20 years ago. Used to go to and buy a whole bag full for the gedunk a couple times a week.
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
They have been doing that for a long time. I don't notice any more 12oz than previous, and I still see all the same 1lb packages as before (though about a buck more expensive per package).

What I have noticed is breakfast cereal is quickly approaching the size where it will not actually be sufficient for a single meal for 3 kids before school.
The previous 12 ounces WAS a lb. at one time.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

Shrinkflation database tracks diminishing size of food products



The Shrinkflation Tracker, by Sam Lader, is on a mission to stop manufacturers quietly putting less food inside product packaging without a corresponding fall in price to consumers. The practice is out of control, so much so that even major retailers are beginning to warn customers against lest they suspect complicity in the practice.

Among the brands named and shamed by the site are Pringles (7% shrink in the weight of chips in a tube), Dove soap (20% shrink in bar size) and Colgate (25%!). From the packaging and candy brands, the site appears to be for products in Britain and Ireland. Hopefully a U.S. section will be forthcoming.

Shrinkflation, a subtle yet significant phenomenon, refers to the practice of manufacturers reducing the size or quantity of a product while maintaining its price. The platform offers users the opportunity to contribute their observations and engage in discussions related to these changes.
By tracking changes in product sizes and quantities and uniting individuals who are concerned about fair consumer practices, Shrinkflation Index aims to create a space for advocacy and informed consumerism.




A supermarket chain is shaming suppliers like PepsiCo over ‘shrinkflation’—by labeling examples on shelves



Now, the French supermarket chain Carrefour is exposing examples of it for shoppers, with labels on shelves reading: “This product has seen its volume or weight fall and the effective price from the supplier rise.”

Dozens of products have been hit with the labels since Monday, according to Reuters.

“The aim in stigmatizing these products is to be able to tell manufacturers to rethink their pricing policy,” Stefen Bompais, director of client communications at Carrefour, told the news agency. Carrefour will soon enter annual price negotiations with Nestlé, Unilever, PepsiCo, and other owners of well-known brands.

Among the shrinkflation examples it’s showing shoppers are Guigoz infant formula, produced by Nestlé, and a bottle of sugar-free peach-flavored Lipton iced tea, produced by PepsiCo.

Despite the cost of raw materials falling, consumers goods companies have not been cooperating with efforts to cut prices, Carrefour CEO Alexandre Bompard has argued. He’s found in ally in French finance minister Bruno Le Maire, who’s urged corporations to lower prices—and pointed a finger at Unilever, Nestle and PepsiCo for not complying.
 

Kyle

Beloved Misanthrope
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Clem72

Well-Known Member

Shrinkflation database tracks diminishing size of food products



The Shrinkflation Tracker, by Sam Lader, is on a mission to stop manufacturers quietly putting less food inside product packaging without a corresponding fall in price to consumers. The practice is out of control, so much so that even major retailers are beginning to warn customers against lest they suspect complicity in the practice.
Tracker didn't last too long. Another victim of shrinkflation, that website reduced the size of their contents by 99%
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Shrinkflation has ALWAYS been the case. I remember a conversation I had with my Dad. He mentioned that stuff like spaghetti sauce - the “regular” size - was 32 ounces. Then 28. Then 23 for some reason. Then they just stopped, raised the price and went back to 32.

Of course, during COVID, cereal boxes were thinner front to back, so you got less but the box LOOKED the same and the price didn’t change.

I can barely think of a time when I didn’t see something like this - ground coffee in cans, canned vegetables, pizza sizes. Always.
 

herb749

Well-Known Member
Went to the market this morning. Those 8 oz bags of shredded cheese are now 7 oz. Same price as before.

Do they really think no one notices .?
 

TPD

the poor dad
and people wonder why grandma's recipe doesn't taste the same way when grandma made it. Well grandma was working with a full deck, or rather a full quart jar or pint can, not a 28oz jar or a 13oz can. I want my half gallon of ice cream back Dammit !!!
 
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