So...what are you reading lately?

JeJeTe

Happiness
ah. good thing you mentioned Paper Towns. I was mulling over that one but I think I'll go ahead and skip it. But I strongly suggest Tracy Chevalier if you like fiction with a little history. Never been disappointed in any of her books :yay:




That's it...heading to the library this weekend. She sounds like just my kind of author :lol:
I'll try these out! Thanks! :smile:

She has a snarky sense of humor that is to die for.

She's hilarious! I've read Bitter is the New Black and Such a Pretty Fat. Both are very good.
I've read all of her memoirs and then some of her fiction work and it's all hilarious!
 

migtig

aka Mrs. Giant
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
That was surprisingly good while being profoundly disturbing. Well, mostly the pictures were disturbing.

I have the latest in the FBI Series "Nemesis" by Catherine Coulter in my to read, while I finish up my Kendra Elliott book. However, I'm really waiting on the new Harper Lee book to arrive any day now.

I just read "Maude" recently, and didn't think I'd like it, and wound up being glad I did. Thought provoking and I think anyone would read that and identify with someone in the book.

A sci-fi -ish series I finished is the "Origins" series by Mark Henrikson - it mixes ancient aliens with historical facts and religions with some action and men-in-black stuff. Goofy sounding as heck, but actually really serious and good.

Another series this year was "JET" by Russell Blake - fast paced action with a kick ass "former" female Mossad agent as the lead character. I think I got the first one a free download and got immediately hooked.
 

libertytyranny

Dream Stealer
All I'm reading right now are RV living books, but last week I read Freakonomics, and before that I was sucked into the Rona Jaffe books. And I read Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, and a couple chick books by Jen Lancaster.

I read a lot.
how did you like Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children? I read that not too long ago as well (I was sucked in by the cover) and I can't decide how I feel about it. I feel like it didn't end. Shouldn't there be more, or something? it was just missing some element I couldn't quite grasp. imaginative though.




I recently read "ready player one" that came in my boyfriends lootcrate of all things..and I LOVED it. It is full of cool 80s culture references and is just well written and fun. The whole time I was reading it I thought it would make an incredible movie, and it appears one is in the works.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
how did you like Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children? I read that not too long ago as well (I was sucked in by the cover) and I can't decide how I feel about it. I feel like it didn't end. Shouldn't there be more, or something? it was just missing some element I couldn't quite grasp. imaginative though.
It was a page turner in the beginning, then jumped the shark about 3/4 of the way through, and totally derailed at the end. I liked it, but not enough to read the sequel.

Shirley Jackson has a book called We Have Always Lived in the Castle that I think you'd like. And Mig, you'd like it, too.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
The Martian [yeah that one] - thanks Foxhound


before that

Chris Kyles: American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms
 
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GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
I just started Blind Man's Bluff about US submarine service beginning after WWII.
:yay:


read that one yrs ago .... awesome stuff
placing a TAP on an undersea telephone cable .... :whistle:

I purchased this at the same time:

K-19 THE WIDOWMAKER: The Secret Story of The Soviet Nuclear Submarine Paperback – July 1, 2002
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
FANTASTIC read. Fascinating, amazing, riveting. Now I wanna read it again!
This is very well written. When the 1 sub had a battery fire I felt like I was there with them crossing the plank to safety when the abandoned the sub.

I was curious how these military books read for civilians. I read a lot of the Vietnam era army books. Nick Rowe's Five Years to Freedom & Dieter Dengler's Hero Found were 2 memorable books. Even though I wasn't in the Army, I understand the culture to some degree.
 

Larry Gude

Strung Out
This is very well written. When the 1 sub had a battery fire I felt like I was there with them crossing the plank to safety when the abandoned the sub.

I was curious how these military books read for civilians. I read a lot of the Vietnam era army books. Nick Rowe's Five Years to Freedom & Dieter Dengler's Hero Found were 2 memorable books. Even though I wasn't in the Army, I understand the culture to some degree.
I hear you. I never served and could read '#### my lpo says' for hours on Facebook. No idea if they think it funny.
 

my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
I've recently started reading via Kindle. Still like real books, but find this incredibly easy. I borrow books from the library to download to it.

The Night Circus - Erin Morgenstern Really enjoyed this book. Magic/fantasy, light reading.

The Fault in Our Stars - John Green Was recommended by the young man I sat beside on the plane home from Montana. Thought provoking.

The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown Read this one years ago, and LOVED it. The re-read was just as good.

And because I can get them all from the library, I'm reading J D Robb's In Death series. I'm up to #9 (I think she's on #22?), and so far haven't guessed the end of one.

I really want to read the Game of Thrones series, but I REALLY want him to finish them first (which appears to not be happening any time soon).
 

stgislander

Well-Known Member
My wife picked up a bunch of American Heritage books from the 60's at a yard sale. I'm really enjoying them. They are full of little known stories from American history.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
I'm alternating between several books. During my "devotionals," I'm reading "The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up," by Marie Kondo. As far as life-changing, it truly is; it's not just about decluttering and organizing. It's an embrasure of a mind set; a shift in thinking and doing.

At night, before bed, I'm reading "Limits of Power," by Elizabeth Moon. It's a sword and sorcery type fiction book that's part of a series that was first published in 1988. There are 10 books in the series, plus a couple of related short stories. "Limits of Power" is number 9 in the series.

I just started a couple of other books that I read off and on; "How to Get Well," by Paavo Airola, and "Die Broke," by Stephan Pollan and Mark Levine.

"How to Get Well" deals with our most common ailments and suggests alternative approaches to dealing with them; primarily food as medicine. That's no longer new, but he was on the cutting edge of that well before the modern movement. He also deals with vitamins and supplements, fasting, juicing (fruits and vegetables, not steroids), and so on.

"Die Broke" is a four-part financial plan for radically changing your life. "Quit Today, Pay Cash, Don't Retire, Die Broke."
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
Earlier this summer I read this book. The Forgotten Hero of My Lai: The Hugh Thompson Story by Trent Angers. If you can believe the facts in the book, this guy did the right thing but he paid a steep price for that. They even tried to bring him up on charges. Looking back 40+ years have shown what courage he had that awful day.
 
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GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Courtesy of Foxhound:

The Martian
American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms

I found on my own;

An Ancient Peace (Peacekeeper 1) Tayna Huff - I have read 5 of her other books ....
Lost Fleet Series - read the 1st one, but the rest of the series 1/4 way through book 2
The Science Fiction Century
 
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