So...what are you reading lately?

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
Current read" "In the Ruins of the Reich", Douglas Botting.

Unbelievable...a glimpse in to the aftermath of Armageddon..
 

glhs837

Power with Control
Current read" "In the Ruins of the Reich", Douglas Botting.

Unbelievable...a glimpse in to the aftermath of Armageddon..
Watched a show about that, was pretty crazy, the rubble ladies who formed bucket brigades and basically cleaned up the bombed out cities among other things.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
I'm reading "All the Money In the World", which is a biography of J. Paul Getty. The movie apparently focuses on the kidnapping, but the book is a true biography from birth to death, including insight on his wives, sons, and grandchildren.

It's fascinating. :yay:
 

MJ

Material Girl
PREMO Member
I purchased Sean Spicer's book, but put it up over the holidays as to not trigger my more liberal family members over the holidays. Evidently I've hidden it from myself because I can't find it anywhere. :lol:
 

jazz lady

~*~ Rara Avis ~*~
Not much time for reading lately, but I did finish an awesome book last week. "The Warner Boys: Our Family’s Story of Autism and Hope" by Ana and Curt Warner is an account of the struggles and triumphs of their life with twin autistic boys.

My best friend has an autistic daughter as well as my nephew and his wife, and I know the challenges they have faced. This book is about Seahawks star running back Curt Warner and his wife, Ana, who dropped out of sight after he retired from football but very few people knew the real reason: their twins, Austin and Christian, had been diagnosed with severe autism. Great inspiring story about staying together as a family against all odds.
 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
I just finished Extreme Ownership: How US Navy SEALs Lead and Win by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin.

I have The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis queued up.
 

ms23699

New Member
  1. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson I picked this up on a recent trip, hope to get to it this weekend.
  2. AUDIBLE- The Federalist Papers
  3. AUDIBLE- History's Greatest Voyages of Exploration (The Great Courses: Civilization & Culture)
  4. AUDIBLE- The History of the Medieval World-From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade
 

jazz lady

~*~ Rara Avis ~*~
Went to the jazz festival at the St. Clement's Island Museum on Saturday and picked up this book in their gift shop. Fascinating so far!

 

Yooper

Up. Identified. Lase. Fire. On the way.
PREMO Member
Just finished the Robert Harris Cicero/Rome trilogy: Imperium, Conspirata, and Dictator.

All VERY worthwhile. Reinforced why I a) hate politics and b) understand its necessity. Fits in quite well with what is going on in politics nowadays (though not necessarily for reasons that may immediately come to mind).

Anyway, if you like excellent writing (I don't think Harris has ever written a bad novel; you may already know of some of his other works like Enigma, Fatherland, Ghost Writer, or Archangel), enjoy historical fiction, and find Rome fascinating I think you will enjoy this trilogy and find it worth your time.

The first book begins at the time Sulla resigned the dictatorship (c. 79 B.C.) and the third book ends with Cicero's death at the start of the Second Triumverate (c. 43 B.C.). Pretty much covers the entirety of Cicero's public life.

Here are a few nuggets from one of the greatest orators of antiquity:

A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. - A comment made during the Cataline Wars (this period is covered in Conspirata).

Do not blame Caesar, blame the people of Rome who have so enthusiastically acclaimed and adored him and rejoiced in their loss of freedom and danced in his path and gave him triumphal processions. Blame the people who hail him when he speaks in the Forum of the 'new, wonderful good society' which shall now be Rome, interpreted to mean 'more money, more ease, more security, more living fatly at the expense of the industrious.'

More here:

Cheers!

--- End of line (MCP)
 

stgislander

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
My wife was at Ollies and picked me up a copy of David McCullough's The Pioneers. It's about one of the first migrations into Ohio after the Revolution. I'll likely started it this weekend.
 

phreddyp

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
Doctor Sleep by Stephen King. I had not read a SK novel in about 20 years this one builds off The Shining and did not disappoint.
 

UglyBear

Well-Known Member
My wife was at Ollies and picked me up a copy of David McCullough's The Pioneers. It's about one of the first migrations into Ohio after the Revolution. I'll likely started it this weekend.
That's an awesome topic. I feel that in general American History curriculum, there's a huge gap on that period of expansion -- it usually goes "One of the causes of the Revolution was that we wanted to expand beyond Appalachia" to "Louisiana Purchase blah".
 

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
Follow Me To Alaska by Ann Parker

Decently written book. I'm about halfway through. Long story short, middle aged couple sell everything they own and move off the grid in Alaska. To say things don't go as planned would be an understatement. They have to rely a lot on the locals to show them the ropes and overcome the steep learning curve of remote living.

I give them credit for gritting it out. A younger version of me would have loved to do what they are doing. I see a lot of parallels of what Vrai and I are doing. It's not the normal, later in life living style. But as long as it works for them, that's all that matters.

The view from their home.
 

my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
Patron
Just finished "The Secret Keeper" by Kate Morton. Kinda slow, but kept my interest. WWII based, skips between then and now (mystery of a dying woman).

Another book by Morton, "The Forgotten Garden", also a skip back and forth, was a good read.
 
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