Some interesting news for TV cordcutters

my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
Patron
I've been using Sling for a few months, for $25 a month, lots cheaper than cable, and get to watch Channel 4 local news - YEAH!

Just signed on to this Locast, works great. I'll probably keep my Sling for a bit longer, I like HGTV, but I'm gonna put this on Mama's smart TV, she'll love getting the local news again.
 

imaref

Member
Hope your Mom likes it. I found it pretty easy to use on Roku. The picture quality looks like cable TV--not quite the quality of Directv, but definitely watchable.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
We used to record tv on vhs. Is anything like that available now?
I use to record cable on a DVD recorder up until about 5-6 years ago, they started embedding copy protection into the cable signal and the DVD recorder I had would not allow recording. I wouldn't be surprised if the cable broadcasts did not allow recording.

Otherwise, hotdamn about the OTA stuff, Sling gave me NBC and FOX, ABC gave me most of their shows free with their app.

I was missing CBS!
 

willie

Well-Known Member
The free Washington DC Channels are up and running on Locast.org - I tried watching them on computer and also through Roku. Very good, especially if you are a cordcutter and aren't getting local channels. It's free! Picture is decent.

Channels available:

WRC (NBC 4)

WTTG (FOX 5)

WJLA (ABC 7)

WUSA (CBS 9)

WFDC (Univision)

WDCA (my20)

WETA (PBS)

WZDC (Telemundo)

WDCW (the CW)

WPXW (ION Television)

Here's what you need to do, whether you want to watch on computer or on Roku:

1. Go to locast.org and sign up for a free account (make sure your browser allows the website to access your location or you will have difficulty; I used the Chrome browser after having difficulty with Firefox and Edge).

2. When you want to watch on computer, just login at locast.org and click on the program you want to watch on the TV Guide (you must temporarily disable any adblockers--they do nag for a donation at the start of watching but it's quick).

3. Go to the Roku store and search for locast.org - add the channel, then go to the channel. You login with the same login info as the locast.org website. Once logged in you will see a mini TV guide with the channels--just highlight and click on the one that you want to watch.

This will be nice for those of you that cut the cord and aren't getting local channels but want to watch DC sports events, etc. Post about your experiences!
It Works! Thank you.
 
I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who does this directly on their Internet connected TV. I can see where viewing on my laptop would get to be inconvenient. I could run an HDMI cable from the laptop to the TV, but it would be great if it could be done on the TV itself.
 

willie

Well-Known Member
I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who does this directly on their Internet connected TV. I can see where viewing on my laptop would get to be inconvenient. I could run an HDMI cable from the laptop to the TV, but it would be great if it could be done on the TV itself.
[/QUO
Roku's are cheap and a one time purchase.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I've been using Sling for a few months, for $25 a month, lots cheaper than cable, and get to watch Channel 4 local news - YEAH!

Just signed on to this Locast, works great. I'll probably keep my Sling for a bit longer, I like HGTV, but I'm gonna put this on Mama's smart TV, she'll love getting the local news again.
Just added locast. So what's the deal with "donations" if it's intended to be free?
 

JEFF69Z28

Member
Does any of this other stuff get the discovery channel,military channel history channel..etc..etc oh and the playboy channels my brother wants to know this
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
There are a couple of problems with cutting the cord.
You can end up spending just as much if not more on just subscriptions.
It seems nothing is free. A lot of the apps for specific networks require you to log in with either a cable or Dirctv account.
Or of course purchase the service. Even at $5 a month, it adds up when you do it one channel at a time.
The networks have caught on to the digital subscription thing.

The other problem is a decent high speed network connection. One that's fast enough to stream and has bandwidth of internet browsing and email.
Reliable as well.
If the signal to noise ration is low, your effective data transfer rate is going to be low, lower than what is advertised.
Not to menton the cost of the broadband service.
 

sastanley

Member
BP, it is a balancing act.
I have DSL here that is advertised at 6Mb on my router, but it is only $33/month. Is that fast enough for a household full of constant streamers? Definitely not, but the wife and I are the only ones left, and I don't think the cats can pick up the remote or use a smart phone;). Comcast would be $75+. Add in all the subscriptions you talk about and it indeed may not be any cheaper than my current slow internet and DirecTV.
I appreciate all the discussion here, there are many options.
 
Read some of the reviews on Google Play Store. Seems that as time passes, the number of interrupts for donations increases, to the point where it won't play unless you contribute, and disables the account.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
There are a couple of problems with cutting the cord.
You can end up spending just as much if not more on just subscriptions.
The idea of course is to end up paying for what you want, rather than for a ton of stuff you never use.
Generally, I don't watch sports unless it's NFL, and then mostly Ravens or Redskins. So I don't need two dozen sports channels.
If I can reliably access old shows - then I don't need DVR.
Since it's streaming - all I need is a means to stream at every TV - so I don't need a cable box or DVR.
Right now I am paying around 250, and we already need more bandwidth, because the kids stream EVERYTHING.

Biggest hurdle is - attitude. Have to persuade everyone to do things differently.
 

imaref

Member
If I read the law correctly, the reason that locast.org can rebroadcast the over-the-air channels without fear of being shut down and sued is that they are a NONPROFIT. As a nonprofit, they can solicit donations for operating costs, but not to make a profit. There was a popular service a few years back called Aereo which did the same thing that locast.org is doing, BUT they were charging and making a profit. They got sued by the networks and got shut down: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aereo
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
There are a couple of problems with cutting the cord.
You can end up spending just as much if not more on just subscriptions.
It seems nothing is free. A lot of the apps for specific networks require you to log in with either a cable or Dirctv account.
Or of course purchase the service. Even at $5 a month, it adds up when you do it one channel at a time.
The networks have caught on to the digital subscription thing.

The other problem is a decent high speed network connection. One that's fast enough to stream and has bandwidth of internet browsing and email.
Reliable as well.
If the signal to noise ration is low, your effective data transfer rate is going to be low, lower than what is advertised.
Not to menton the cost of the broadband service.
It takes just about every subscription to do that. Most people have Netflix anyway and fast internet.

I pay $95/month less than I did with cable, it would take a hell of a lot of subscriptions to make up that $95/month.
 

my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
Patron
I have Sling ($25 a month) and an Amazon Fire Stick (one time fee) and watch channel 4 whenever I want. Gotta have internet to run the fire stick.
 

JEFF69Z28

Member
What else can you watch do these roku sling things have all the channels that directv has I could care less about the local news channels.
 

awpitt

Main Streeter
I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who does this directly on their Internet connected TV. I can see where viewing on my laptop would get to be inconvenient. I could run an HDMI cable from the laptop to the TV, but it would be great if it could be done on the TV itself.

Google Chrome Cast solves this problem. It plugs into the HDMI port on your TV. Then you can use you phone, tablet, laptop, desktop PC, etc. to cast to it and it is on you TV.
 
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