U.S. Cardinal Hammers Islamic Immigration

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
"I think the fundamental question here, is someone who resists large-scale Muslim immigration committing an immoral act and therefore should be let's say denied Holy Communion or in some way recognized as a public sinner?" Burke said as he noted what was being asked. "To resist large-scale Muslim immigration, in my judgment, is to be responsible in the sense of making sure that those who are immigrating to the country remember that the definition of the Church's teaching is that the individuals are not able to find a way of living in their own country and this is not true of immigrants who come who are opportunists and in particular in the case of Islam which by its definition believes itself to be destined to rule the world, coming in large numbers to countries you don't have to be a rocket scientist to see what's happened."

"For instance, in Europe, in countries like France and Germany and also here in Italy and it's also happening in the United States," Burke continued. "There's a very interesting book written called 'No-Go Zones' and which records places in the United States where in fact Muslim immigrants have set up their own legal order in other words they resist the authority the legitimate or authority of the state."

"And so, to be opposed to wholesale, or large-scale Muslim immigration is in fact as far as I'm concerned the responsible exercise of one's patriotism in the sense that we, yes people are true refugees who can't live in their own country we must receive them and help them in every way, but this is not the case when you have simply a large-scale immigration."


https://www.dailywire.com/news/47570/watch-us-cardinal-hammers-islamic-immigration-daily-wire



:oldman:
 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
Gee, I remember a time when we wanted members of the clergy to STFU when it comes to matters of the sovereign state.

That time being last week :lol:
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
Yea, that’s pretty much the way it works, eh?
On this subject, for me, yes. This isn't as big a deal here in America as it is in Europe.

I did 2 overseas tours in Europe. I enjoyed traveling around to the different countries. They are a lot different, even though they share a continent. What makes them different are the people that live there. Centuries old cultures. Now those cultures are in danger of being diluted down. Many towns that have allowed economic migrants are experiencing issues that they never had to deal with before. Italy is at a crossroads. They get all the boat people coming out of Libya. The locals see the migrants walking around with cell phones, living in housing and getting a daily stipend. While elderly Italians that have worked their entire lives go without and are just as needy. People, especially young women, are fearful to venture out alone, where before that was never an issue. The migrants become restless and every few months take to the streets and riot. Because nothing shows your gratitude to you host nation that going to it's commerce center and breaking windows, throwing rocks and busting things up.

Riots
 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
On this subject, for me, yes. This isn't as big a deal here in America as it is in Europe.

I did 2 overseas tours in Europe. I enjoyed traveling around to the different countries. They are a lot different, even though they share a continent. What makes them different are the people that live there. Centuries old cultures. Now those cultures are in danger of being diluted down. Many towns that have allowed economic migrants are experiencing issues that they never had to deal with before. Italy is at a crossroads. They get all the boat people coming out of Libya. The locals see the migrants walking around with cell phones, living in housing and getting a daily stipend. While elderly Italians that have worked their entire lives go without and are just as needy. People, especially young women, are fearful to venture out alone, where before that was never an issue. The migrants become restless and every few months take to the streets and riot. Because nothing shows your gratitude to you host nation that going to it's commerce center and breaking windows, throwing rocks and busting things up.

Riots
Sure, I hold dual Italian citizenship and am quite aware of the demographic challenges. I was more interested in the dichotomy here I mentioned in my OP is all.

But while citizens surely are right to be upset with government largesse to economic migrants, you're overstating the plight of poor Italians. Even I with mere jus sanguinis citizenship am entitled to health care and welfare without ever having paid a dime into that system, save for the fees it cost me to various areas of the Italian bureaucracy and to official government translators to translate relevant documents. Not that I'll need either, but I am certainly eligible.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
jus sanguinis citizenship
This is different than your run of the mill economic migrant. I bet you wouldn't get the same deal in Germany or France. I know several people in the same situation as you are in. They are a net positive for the host nation, not a drain, like the migrants.
 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
This is different than your run of the mill economic migrant. I bet you wouldn't get the same deal in Germany or France. I know several people in the same situation as you are in. They are a net positive for the host nation, not a drain, like the migrants.
I wasn't speaking to my citizenship vs. that of migrants. I was speaking to the Italian citizens who you describe as having worked their whole life and are just as needy.

But sure we can agree there are demographic problems across Europe.
 
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