George Santos

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
So, I got no dog in that fight and am not really sure what state Santos is from - California? Anyway, how can they kick him out of Congress just for lying and fraud? Are they going to hold all members accountable and kick all those ****ing crooks out? Hell, the so-called Ethics Committee is filled with shitbags who should be in prison.

Oh, he lied about his background and qualifications!!! :jameo:

Ha. Now do Joe Biden.....

He lied about being attacked! :jameo:

Paging AOC....

So what did Santos really do to piss off the political hack scumbags? Not kick up? Threaten to expose them? Also is it really their business to kick people they don't like out of their little dictators' club? Shouldn't that be up to the people in his district come voting time? Kick him out of the party, sure, but out of Congress??
 

Kyle

ULTRA-F###ING-MAGA!
PREMO Member
So what did Santos really do to piss off the political hack scumbags?

He took a reliably Democrat district away from them in 2022.

Gutless Gops are content to sacrifice him quickly to get their Liz Cheney/Adam Kinzinger moment aka...

"See us killing one of ours for you wonderful Democrats? Please like me?"
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
Again Republicans tuning victory into defeat.
His votes were 100% conservative.
Probably the same RINO's that are anti-Trump.
The Republican party is as useless as tits on a boar hog.
 

StmarysCity79

Well-Known Member
Funny you guys are fine with credit card fraud, campaign finance violations, stealing form the elderly.

Why do you keep supporting criminals?

It's very easy to prove that he took unemployment while being employed.

Conspiracy to Commit Offenses Against the U.S.: Santos was charged with one count of violating 18 U.S. Code § 371 for a scheme in which he allegedly made up false campaign contributions in order to obtain support from a national political committee, and stole donors’ personal information and credit card information, which he used to make unauthorized campaign contributions in other peoples’ names.

The statute prohibits at least two people from “conspir[ing] either to commit any offense against the United States, or to defraud the United States, or any agency thereof in any manner or for any purpose,” and doing anything to take action on that conspiracy, and is punishable by a fine and/or up to five years in prison.

Wire Fraud: Santos was charged with nine counts of wire fraud, which is punishable by a fine and/or up to 20 years in prison, for wiring money as part of the fraudulent scheme, as well as for other schemes in which Santos solicited donations to a fake campaign company and then used those funds on personal expenses, and falsely claimed unemployment benefits despite having a job, according to the DOJ.

False Statements: Santos faces four counts for allegedly making false statements on campaign finance reports in 2021 and April 2022 and House disclosure reports in 2020 and 2022, which are punishable by a fine and/or up to five years in prison.

Falsification of a Record or Document: Santos has been charged with two counts of falsifying documents for making allegedly false entries in his 2021 year-end and April 2022 quarterly campaign finance reports, which is punishable by a fine and/or up to 20 years in prison.

Aggravated Identity Theft: Santos faces two counts of alleged aggravated identity theft, which occurs when someone “knowingly transfers, possesses, or uses, without lawful authority, a means of identification of another person” as part of a felony violation, for allegedly falsely listing donors who did not actually donate to his campaign on campaign reports, and for the alleged scheme in which he used donors’ credit card information to make fraudulent charges.
Aggravated identity theft is punishable by two years in prison, and the statute notes that the sentence typically cannot be served concurrently with any other prison sentence or shortened because of other sentences, and violations are not eligible for parole.

Access Device Fraud: Prosecutors claim Santos violated 18 U.S. Code § 1029 through his credit card fraud scheme, which prohibits people from knowingly using an access device issued to someone else—like a credit card or account number—with intent to defraud in order to receive payments of at least $1,000, and is punishable by a fine and/or up to 15 years in prison.

Unlawful Monetary Transactions Over $10,000: Santos was charged with three violations of 18 U.S. Code § 1957 for allegedly transferring campaign contributions to his personal bank account, which prohibits knowingly engaging in monetary transactions of more than $10,000 that’s derived from unlawful activity, and is punishable by a fine and/or up to 10 years in prison.
Theft of Public Money: Santos was charged with stealing public money from the U.S. Treasury, which is punishable by a fine and/or up to 10 years in prison, for his alleged unemployment scheme, in which the now-lawmaker fraudulently received nearly $25,000 between June 2020 and April 2021, according to the DOJ.
 

Kinnakeet

Well-Known Member
Funny you guys are fine with credit card fraud, campaign finance violations, stealing form the elderly.

Why do you keep supporting criminals?

It's very easy to prove that he took unemployment while being employed.

Conspiracy to Commit Offenses Against the U.S.: Santos was charged with one count of violating 18 U.S. Code § 371 for a scheme in which he allegedly made up false campaign contributions in order to obtain support from a national political committee, and stole donors’ personal information and credit card information, which he used to make unauthorized campaign contributions in other peoples’ names.

The statute prohibits at least two people from “conspir[ing] either to commit any offense against the United States, or to defraud the United States, or any agency thereof in any manner or for any purpose,” and doing anything to take action on that conspiracy, and is punishable by a fine and/or up to five years in prison.

Wire Fraud: Santos was charged with nine counts of wire fraud, which is punishable by a fine and/or up to 20 years in prison, for wiring money as part of the fraudulent scheme, as well as for other schemes in which Santos solicited donations to a fake campaign company and then used those funds on personal expenses, and falsely claimed unemployment benefits despite having a job, according to the DOJ.

False Statements: Santos faces four counts for allegedly making false statements on campaign finance reports in 2021 and April 2022 and House disclosure reports in 2020 and 2022, which are punishable by a fine and/or up to five years in prison.

Falsification of a Record or Document: Santos has been charged with two counts of falsifying documents for making allegedly false entries in his 2021 year-end and April 2022 quarterly campaign finance reports, which is punishable by a fine and/or up to 20 years in prison.

Aggravated Identity Theft: Santos faces two counts of alleged aggravated identity theft, which occurs when someone “knowingly transfers, possesses, or uses, without lawful authority, a means of identification of another person” as part of a felony violation, for allegedly falsely listing donors who did not actually donate to his campaign on campaign reports, and for the alleged scheme in which he used donors’ credit card information to make fraudulent charges.
Aggravated identity theft is punishable by two years in prison, and the statute notes that the sentence typically cannot be served concurrently with any other prison sentence or shortened because of other sentences, and violations are not eligible for parole.

Access Device Fraud: Prosecutors claim Santos violated 18 U.S. Code § 1029 through his credit card fraud scheme, which prohibits people from knowingly using an access device issued to someone else—like a credit card or account number—with intent to defraud in order to receive payments of at least $1,000, and is punishable by a fine and/or up to 15 years in prison.

Unlawful Monetary Transactions Over $10,000: Santos was charged with three violations of 18 U.S. Code § 1957 for allegedly transferring campaign contributions to his personal bank account, which prohibits knowingly engaging in monetary transactions of more than $10,000 that’s derived from unlawful activity, and is punishable by a fine and/or up to 10 years in prison.
Theft of Public Money: Santos was charged with stealing public money from the U.S. Treasury, which is punishable by a fine and/or up to 10 years in prison, for his alleged unemployment scheme, in which the now-lawmaker fraudulently received nearly $25,000 between June 2020 and April 2021, according to the DOJ.
Who let you out of the basement
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Funny you guys are fine with credit card fraud, campaign finance violations, stealing form the elderly.

Why do you keep supporting criminals?

Are you talking about the Democrats? Because all of that is true about the Democrats - pretty much every single one of them.
 

Kyle

ULTRA-F###ING-MAGA!
PREMO Member
images
 

CPUSA

Well-Known Member
Funny you guys are fine with credit card fraud, campaign finance violations, stealing form the elderly.

Why do you keep supporting criminals?
Funny, you're fine with all of this from your Party of Criminals as well, you festering canker....

Now get back in your box, Gimp!!!! :whip::whip:
 

StmarysCity79

Well-Known Member
Like he did with Crimea?
View attachment 174147
Tubby, you REALLY don't want to go there


Trump said Putin did “an amazing job of taking the mantle” when Russia annexed Crimea in 2014. During the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump broke with US policy and suggested he was OK if Russia kept the Ukrainian territory. He repeated a Kremlin talking point, saying, “The people of Crimea, from what I’ve heard, would rather be with Russia than where they were.”

Trump aides softened GOP platform on Ukraine​

Ahead of the 2016 Republican National Convention, Trump campaign aides blocked language from the party platform that called for the US government to send lethal weapons to Ukraine for its war against Russian proxies. Mueller investigated this for potential collusion but determined the change was not made “at the behest” of Russia. (The Trump administration ultimately gave lethal arms and anti-tank weapons to the Ukrainian military.)

Trump spread Russian myths about Ukraine​

During his impeachment proceedings in 2019 and early 2020, Trump said many false things about Ukraine that align with Russian disinformation about the country. This includes claims of uncontrollable corruption, improper ties between Ukrainian officials and the Obama administration, and allegations that Ukraine meddled in US elections. This helps Putin’s goal of destabilizing US-Ukraine relations.

Trump temporarily froze US aid for Ukraine​

As the impeachment inquiry revealed, Trump personally froze $391 million in US military and security assistance for Ukraine in mid-2019. US diplomats said Ukraine desperately needed the help for its war against Russian proxies. Previously, the Trump administration had slow-walked sales of anti-tank missiles to Ukraine because of concerns it would upset Russia, according to a State Department official.

Trump smeared US ambassador to Ukraine​

For more than a year, Trump privately and publicly attacked Marie Yovanovitch, who was the US ambassador to Ukraine until he recalled her in spring 2019. One of Russia’s goals is to weaken the US-Ukraine alliance – Trump played into that by smearing Yovanovitch and undermining her diplomatic work in Ukraine. Her ouster was a major part of Trump’s impeachment.
 
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