Greetings from Tombstone!

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
Again, I would like to know the effects y’all are experiencing with the overflow of illegals. Thanks.
There was a large influx of illegals when we were in Las Cruces. We didn't see them out and about, but if you think about it you wouldn't really expect to. They're warehoused at a facility and aren't out shopping or drinking beer in a pub or, you know, looking for work. They were largely invisible to us, but causing a stir with the locals who had to give up their community center, high school, and tax dollars to provide food and medical care for these foreign people. And then there's the American citizen, on the corner begging for money...

Anyway, I believe (but am not positive) that cities quarantine them as best they can until they can be treated for their various diseases and whatever else is wrong with them. I imagine they then have to find them work and a real place to live - and taxpayers pay for that, too. My understanding from talking to local people is that there will be a handful who will "fall through the cracks" and just disappear. Chances are good those are the drug runners.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
On the news, they mentioned that the high school would have to be disinfected before students would be allowed back in.

"We’re going to have the empty shelters so they can go in there and clean them, and volunteers can get some rest," Vigil said. At the end of the weekend, Vigil said the migrants would be moved again to other shelters, and the school would be "thoroughly cleaned and sanitized" in time for classes to resume next week.
unwashed masses
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
There was a large influx of illegals when we were in Las Cruces. We didn't see them out and about, but if you think about it you wouldn't really expect to. They're warehoused at a facility and aren't out shopping or drinking beer in a pub or, you know, looking for work. They were largely invisible to us, but causing a stir with the locals who had to give up their community center, high school, and tax dollars to provide food and medical care for these foreign people. And then there's the American citizen, on the corner begging for money...

Anyway, I believe (but am not positive) that cities quarantine them as best they can until they can be treated for their various diseases and whatever else is wrong with them. I imagine they then have to find them work and a real place to live - and taxpayers pay for that, too. My understanding from talking to local people is that there will be a handful who will "fall through the cracks" and just disappear. Chances are good those are the drug runners.
Thanks for your thoughts. I find it interesting that y’all are traveling through places that are experiencing current events that are causing upheaval in our Country. What a grand mess of it all because of politics. Wishing you, Monello, and Apollo safe travels.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
I'm allergic to Arizona. Usually pollen season doesn't bother me a lot, but I've been miserable since I got here. It started in Las Cruces and got worse after we got to Tombstone. I've been mainlining Zyrtec-D, which is giving me some relief, but it's so dry here that I'm afraid I'll spontaneously combust.

Ugh.

But we are enjoying our time here (other than the allergy misery). Yesterday I picked up some lovely fat pork chops and marinated them in a maple garlic concoction, so tonight we'll have that with artichokes and grilled corn on the cob.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
On Wednesday I took off for the day. Vrai has her SOMD first of the month responsibilities and she would be tied up most of the day. I knew there was a lake close by. Google wasn't very helpful but I know there are fish in there. I went to try my luck. The camp brochure says the lake is 31 miles from the campground. That must be as the crow flies because it's a lot further than that.

I went to Sierra Vista first. Then I was to take a secondary road to the Coronado Nationa Forest. The GPS wanted to send me where there was no road. Google map wasn't helpful either. I know some times if I persevere the GPS will relent and give me the directions that I want. But after wasting about 20 minutes, I decided to follow the 2nd option the GPS. That would take me way out of the way but on better grade roads. So off I drove. And drove. And drove. I went up by Fort Huacuaca then through 1 more little town before getting on a winding road that paralleled the forest. I kept seeing signs for the lake, so I knew I was good to go.

The lake is part of a dammed up river. They have a marina where you can rent boats and buy stuff for a day on the water. I was able to buy my Arizona fishing license. Since I had my fishing gear, I rented a boat with a propane engine for a couple of hours. I slathered up the sunscreen and then tried my luck. On the way out, 3 people were coming in and they didn't catch anything. The lake is very scenic. Right smack in the middle of the high desert with scrubby bushes and red rocks all around. I tried a bunch of lures without success. It was full sun and I have better luck when it's overcast. I saw 2 other people fishing around a bend and they struck out also. So it may have just been the day I was there.

When it was time to leave I spoke to the guy in the store. I told him I was trying to get back to Tombstone but didn't want to take the long way to get there. He asked me what was I driving. When I told him a Jeep, he said at the first bunch of road signs, go towards Nogales on 48. Follow that for 14 miles till you get to the monument. Then go down the other side till you hit 92, then go right and follow that to Tombstone.

And off I went. 48 was a dirt road. Now I know why he asked what I was driving. And it was dusty, rocky dirt road. To make it interesting they put a bunch of turns in it. I went over a bunch of spots where the road goes underwater when it rains. But there wasn't a cloud in the sky, so rain was the least of my issues. There were a bunch of utility trucks that passed me going the other way. I also saw a few Border Patrol vehicles. 1 was going very slow, pulled to the right and motioned me to pass.

It took me about an hour to cover the 14 miles to the monument. I wasn't sure what he meant by monument but I figured I learn about that when I saw it. There was a parking lot with a few cars and trucks in it. The monument is actually a scenic overlook called Montezuma's Pass. I could see all the way out to Mexico. Even my phone gave me the welcome to Mexico text message although I was still a few miles away from the border. The view from up there was spectacular. The drive to that point wasn't bad either but I had to pay attention to the road way more than on a normal asphalt road.

Going down the other side was more dirt road. The GPS said I had 8 more miles to 92. But after 2 more miles I ended up on paved road. Then my drive back returned to normal. On the way out I covered 91 miles to get to the lake. My return trip was around 50 miles although a very slow 16 miles through the ruts and rocks. My Jeep looked like a snickerdoodle cookie all covered in reddish brown dust.

I'll try to hit the lake again next week. At least now I know how to get there and what to expect once I'm there. Wish me luck in catching my first Arizona fish.

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Almost there
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Sights along the way
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This is the way I came with the dirt road at the base of the mountain
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This is the road back to civilization, the yellow lines in the bottom of the picture. Yes the zigged more than they zagged.
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vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
Today they had a rib and craft beer festival at Tombstone Brewery. For $20 you got a 2 oz glass and 6 fill up tickets, and generous BBQ tastings were $2/ea. There were 5 BBQ stands and we tasted them all, but by the last one I'd had it so Monello just ate it for dinner.

Tomorrow we want to go on the trolley tour of the area, and either see the gunfight comedy or do the mine tour.

I wish I weren't allergic to Tombstone because it's pretty cool here.
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
Today they had a rib and craft beer festival at Tombstone Brewery. For $20 you got a 2 oz glass and 6 fill up tickets, and generous BBQ tastings were $2/ea. There were 5 BBQ stands and we tasted them all, but by the last one I'd had it so Monello just ate it for dinner.

Tomorrow we want to go on the trolley tour of the area, and either see the gunfight comedy or do the mine tour.

I wish I weren't allergic to Tombstone because it's pretty cool here.
I would have never thought the SW would cause allergies. I think of it as dry and arid. I have been to Las Vegas once, and Lake Mead to scatter my parent’s ashes from a houseboat with my bros. That was my parent’s wishes. The reason for that request was my parents traveled the World because my father was Army, and a geophysicist. Apparently, Lake Mead flows to where it’s waters can travel around the World. They wanted to keep on travelin’ on. Anyway, It was so hot that the heat from the sidewalks and roads could be felt through my sneakers. Hope you feel better, and safe travels.
 
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vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
So today we took a trolley tour of the town - residential area, the overlook, and a bunch of areas we wouldn't have thought to explore. 45 minutes long and very entertaining/informative.

After that we went to the Bird Cage Theater, which started off as a nice place to have dinner, and turned into a dance hall/bar/brothel because that's where the money was. In the basement of the Bird Cage there was a continuous poker game that went on for 8 years, 24/7 with no break. Players rotated in and out, and got on a list to play when another player bagged out for whatever reason.

We were going to hit Puny John's for BBQ but then we remembered - Cinco de Mayo! So we headed to Cafe Margarita for margaritas and Mexican chow. Street tacos for Monello, and enchiladas for me.

In case you didn't see the other thread, two things about the movie "Tombstone":

"You're a daisy if you do" relates to pushing up daisies. As in, "I'll kill you if you do."

"I'm your huckleberry" is wrong. It's "I'm your huckle bearer," a huckle being the handle on a casket, and a huckle bearer being a pallbearer. So Doc is saying to Ringo, "I'll carry your casket to your grave." A case where Hollywood got it wrong, if you can possibly imagine that. But all the t-shirts say "I'm your huckleberry" so that's that.
 

HeavyChevy75

Podunk FL
Sierra Vista has the military base and I think that is most of it's residence. I looked a job out there and noped out of it real quick.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
Sierra Vista has the military base and I think that is most of it's residence. I looked a job out there and noped out of it real quick.
Really? Why? I mean, Tombstone is the tourist stuff and that's it, but Sierra Vista is a proper small city with stuff.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
After 6 dry weeks, we had a proper rain shower. It didn't last long but it still counts. Amazing how dry it is around here.
 

Grumpy

Well-Known Member
Sierra Vista has the military base and I think that is most of it's residence. I looked a job out there and noped out of it real quick.
Had a kick-off meeting out there, was looking forward to visiting Tombstone while there. Had a early morning flight out with a 4 hour layover in Atlanta..Well, it was this time of year and had weather delays at BWI and, Atlanta was also shut down at the time, that causes me to miss my connection with no way to Arizona till the next morning(too late). All travel was hosed, stood in line with 50k other people and got the last seat on a plane back to BWI. Got back to BWI at 2AM and home at 4AM, always refer to that as my weeklong trip one night to Atlanta. Never been so frustrated in my life, miserable time.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
Yesterday we went to Bisbee and the farmer's market. This one lady has super good kimchi and Monello needed some, and I picked up some of that homemade sauerkraut. Had lunch at Screaming Banshee - pizza for Monello, wings for me.

Then we went bar hopping in Tombstone! First stop, Crazy Annie's where there is a bordello (actually a little motel) attached; then on to Four Deuces. I wish I could drink more because these saloons are really cool and they have excellent craft beers available on tap.

It's raining like crazy right now, which is pretty cool because it's so dry and I imagine everything soaks up that rain like a sponge.

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Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
And like a lot of the tourist places we visit, the Tombstone locals are from somewhere else. Funny but when you ask them if they are a local, most begin their reply with I've been here for XX years. Our shuttle tour guide was born and raised. He joined the Navy but came back home after his hitch was up. He said growing up was fun. As kids they roamed all over the hills hunting rabbits. They have a boat load of jackrabbits that come out just before sunset here. I imagine these hills are full of them. There is plenty of shrubbery for them to eat and lots of places to hide out.

The ride down to Bisbee is about 22 miles. There is 1 section where we come out of a mountain pass. Then in front of us is this enormous view of a valley and the mountains as a backdrop. It is quite a spectacular view. I know if we take pictures of it that it will be ho hum. You have to see it for yourself. And it's not even 1 of those "must see" views. Just some on the road awesomeness. I hope many of you get to see these types of scenery in your travels.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
Sierra Vista has the military base and I think that is most of it's residence. I looked a job out there and noped out of it real quick.
From what I have seen, Sierra Vista looks like 1 of the better towns to live in. No boarded up storefronts. Plenty of shopping, new housing developments, with scattered parks. All surrounded by the mountains. I would guess that crime is low.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
Boo hoo, one more week and then we leave Tombstone. You all may have seen when I was sobbing at leaving Las Cruces...and Panama City Beach...and South Padre Island...and Bastrop...and Gatlinburg...and all the other cool places we've been.

Tombstone really is one of a kind and I encourage everyone to see it. I know that we have a terrific itinerary ahead of us but I will be sad to leave here. I was unenthusiastic in the beginning, but this dusty cowboy town grew on me hard and I will have fond memories of our time here.

"We may never pass this way again...."
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
Boo hoo, one more week and then we leave Tombstone. You all may have seen when I was sobbing at leaving Las Cruces...and Panama City Beach...and South Padre Island...and Bastrop...and Gatlinburg...and all the other cool places we've been.

Tombstone really is one of a kind and I encourage everyone to see it. I know that we have a terrific itinerary ahead of us but I will be sad to leave here. I was unenthusiastic in the beginning, but this dusty cowboy town grew on me hard and I will have fond memories of our time here.

"We may never pass this way again...."
I love your details and sentiment. Keep on postin’, and RV’in. :)
 
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Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
Friday night we went back to Big Nose Kate's for some dinner and music. The 303, four piece band played for a couple of hours. I asked the bartender what the significance of 303 was. I guessed it was the local area code. Turns out the band is from Benson, AZ and on route I 10, Benson is exit 303. 1 of the band members is the guy who keeps us entertained during the day with his 1 man show. The band played mostly country oriented songs. The bar's acoustics aren't the best but they did a nice job.

We had a night cap over at Four Dueces. They had a mix of locals & tourists. Early on the crowd was a bit rowdy and noisy. We sat on the porch and were somewhat insulated from the rowdies. The drinks are reasonably priced for a tourist town. There is no shortage of places to drink and eat in Tombstone. Many places close around 7 pm, since the reenactors are off the streets by then and the tourists go elsewhere.

Saturday we finally made it over to the Goodenough mine tour. There are miles of mine shafts under the town of Tombstone. Our guide was full of interesting facts. Only 29 mines in Tombstone turned a profit. I don't recall now how many claims were made in the area but it was in the 100s. You get a hardhat prior to entering the mine. I thought it might be a gimmick but there are a ton of low spots where you could actually hit your head. Our group included a few children. The guide was very diplomatic when laying the ground rules and making sure the parents kept their kids under watch at all times. A while ago somebody bumped into 1 of the support posts and put the tour out of business for 3 weeks while they did necessary repairs.

Our guide sure looked the part. Long haired, older guy between 50 & 60. It was hard to tell his true age. He was decked out with his miner's cap and a bunch of gear hanging from his belt. Running tours in & out of the mine several times a day is keeping him young. We got a demonstration for making the holes in the rock where they would place the stix of dynamite. It was a 2 person job and the spike had to be rotated with each hit of the sledge. And this was done underground in a spot illuminated with candles. They worked in 10 hour shifts with 2 shifts per day.

The guide had a great sense of humor. He'd spin a long tale that you thought was true and it turned out that the punch line was miner/mining related. They even hold weddings in the mine, if that is your thing. They had a hony bucket for the miners to use when nature called. We had several wrong guesses as to what that contraption could be. When he told us, it made sense. You had to go somewhere when you were down there that far. The only machine was a steam operated dumb waiter that brought the busted up rock to the surface. All the cars were pushed by hand. Once above ground they used mule teams to move the rocks to the river.

Miners got $4 a day at a time when an average week's pay was $15. The gold and silver was sold to the government. The ignots weighted 180 pounds to prevent theft. In order to exit the mine, we had to walk up some very steep steps. While the kids ran up like billy goats, the adults had to move a lot slower. The trek put a nice burn in your thighs.

Next stop was over to the old county court house. It's now a museum. In the courtyard is a replica gallows. We didn't spend too much time browsing around. It's more of the same guns, indians, machinery and famous Tombstone citizens. Outside the courthouse we got to talking with a couple and it turns out the gal grew up 1 town over from where I grew up. We knew a lot of the same places and some of her relatives grew up 2 blocks from where I lived. It is a small world.

Rounding out our tourist day, we meandered around Boot Hill Cemetery. Around 250 graves on a hill. The ground is rock hard, so digging the graves must have been a heck of a chore at that time. It's not a PC place as some of the headstones have words like Chink & Chinaman. If you were gunned down they'd put the name of the person that shot you.

Today Vrai put some pork ribs in the instantpot. Then they got a coating of sauce and 20 minutes on the grill. They were superb. At first I wasn't going to eat any but the aroma changed my mind. Even Apollo got in on some with a few rib bones. We picked up a humidifier today. This place is bone dry. It dries out your nasal passages something awful.

The drives around here are spectacular. It's not must see scenery like Yellowstone or Mt. Rushmore but it has it's own unique draw. Having grown up on the east coast of the US, we didn't have any scenery quite like what you see out this way.

We still have to take a stagecoach ride before we leave here Friday. It's 1 of those things you have to do once in your life.

Pics to follow.
 
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