I have a question for the business owners

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
yeah but not ever 3 - 6 months 3 - 5 yrs yeah that's acceptable especially for a promotion or more responsibilites in the IT Word

You should come to the Heartland, plants out here replace 5 o 12% of employees each week or two.
Its an amazing turnover.
All plants and distribution centers have full time trainers in each dept that do nothing but train new hires.
 

CPUSA

Well-Known Member
I wasn’t sure where to put this, anyway. What do you as business owners look for in job applicants? I’m sure that background checks are done, but I’m wondering about things like how far back would an applicant put on the application as far as work they have done? And are references a must? What about their credit, does that influence you also? And what about if someone hasn’t worked since 2013?
Thank you for any and all responses you may have. If there is anything else I may have missed, that would be greatly appreciated.
I'll first dig around to see if you were an outstanding individual in middle school and if you weren't perfect even back then, well...no sense in letting you be a part of my Tupperware team, now is there?...
 
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NorthBeachPerso

Honorary SMIB
yeah but not ever 3 - 6 months 3 - 5 yrs yeah that's acceptable especially for a promotion or more responsibilites in the IT Word

I've been told that if you've been with the same company for three years you're hopelessly outdated and five years makes you unhireable. Of course, the people who've told me this are also always wondering why they never get a promotion at their new jobs.

Then there are the ones who want the 50 somethings to retire to make room for promotions (an analogy are the first year teachers who can't figure out why they are ineligible to become a Vice Principal).
 

UglyBear

Well-Known Member
Depends on the job, if your looking for an entry level then yes, but something like a construction project manager then no. Enthusiasm can be faked.

When I evaluate engineers I ask if they work on their own car, built a computer if they are into gaming, ever helped dad do anything like tile a floor etc. For my work a tinkerer type will do better than a straight A bookworm any day. The key is getting the info without it being obvious that is what you are looking for.
Not to distract from the topic of resuscitating ancient keg coolers (a cool engineering topic in and of itself) — would you mind if I pick you brain a bit?

What would make a woman engineer who has the right degree, is a tinkerer, but took time off to be a stay-at-home mom, be hireable in your opinion?

(Mrs Bear is just that, and will need to return to the workforce at some point soon).
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Not to distract from the topic of resuscitating ancient keg coolers (a cool engineering topic in and of itself) — would you mind if I pick you brain a bit?

What would make a woman engineer who has the right degree, is a tinkerer, but took time off to be a stay-at-home mom, be hireable in your opinion?

(Mrs Bear is just that, and will need to return to the workforce at some point soon).
Well where I work all it would take is a willingness to learn, work hard and learn from mistakes.

Women engineers are unicorns though and most likely she will get snapped right up.

What kind of engineer? What are her interests?
 
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PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
In fact....it's a woman running the engineering group at my former company. Not that rare, actually...although they can be just as big a PITA as the male engineers like SGI.
Depends on the discipline, in my class of about 50 ish there was only two and in general IMHO only half of (all) engineers receiving degrees are worth a damn so that meant only one of them was.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
Depends on the discipline, in my class of about 50 ish there was only two and in general IMHO only half of (all) engineers receiving degrees are worth a damn so that meant only one of them was.

Purdue seemed to produce better outcomes for both...
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Purdue seemed to produce better outcomes for both...
In my experience school hasn't mattered. The best engineer and worst engineer I know came from the same school, which is very highly rated. I will say although a small sample size (2), both engineers I know that went to Illinois are excellent.

You are older than me though and from what I understand there use to be more lab work and less class work. Critical thinking and decision making have really taken a hit with the ability to google answers to some problems.
 
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PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Back to the original question I would just put "Break in employment to raise a family or due to being caregiver to handicapped family member" etc. You never know that could be a way to connect with the potential employer.

Sometimes the hardest thing is just being able to comfortably talk to a stranger about yourself. Due to my situation now I would be able to connect with a potential employee that took care of an aging parent.
 

FED_UP

Well-Known Member
I wasn’t sure where to put this, anyway. What do you as business owners look for in job applicants? I’m sure that background checks are done, but I’m wondering about things like how far back would an applicant put on the application as far as work they have done? And are references a must? What about their credit, does that influence you also? And what about if someone hasn’t worked since 2013?
Thank you for any and all responses you may have. If there is anything else I may have missed, that would be greatly appreciated.
I believe the norm is to go back 10 years on the resume, but you got what you got, like someone said explain. In your case I may go past 10 years to at show what I have done prior to not working, can't hurt. And looking like Beyonce helps alot.
 
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