I have a question for the business owners

BernieP

Resident PIA
And yet, job hopping is what's recommended in order for today's workers to get "what they're due". And then they wonder why pensions are no longer offered (and for 65% of employees they never were).

To the original question, What are you looking for?

I'm going to repeat or rephrase some of what I've read, but as someone who has reviewed resumes and had to interview candidates here is my opinion:
In general, presentation. Cover letter and resume look "professional". Spelling and grammar are correct.. Use of acronyms is done properly. Don't try to impress me with alphabet soup. I have an acronyms finder linked because there are often multiple definitions for the same one.

The resume should be tailored to the job you are seeking. You want it to "pop" so it highlights those things the perspective employer is searching for.

There are a variety of formats. Some have you put education and awards first, other prefer to see experience from your most recent back.
Another "suggestion" is the length of the resume, some say no more than two pages. But that's going to depend on your age and relevance to the job you are applying for.

Again, be professional. Don't use cute paper or funky fonts. Use a standard type face in a size that is easy to read. Normal margins as well.

Remember, the cover letter and resume are to get you in the door for an in person interview.

IF YOU ARE FORTUNATE to get an interview, again, be professional.
Dress appropriate. Obviously I don't suggest wearing a suit and tie for an interview to be a truck driver. Just remember, there is causal and there is sloppy, I had this pear who would co-interview some of the people coming in with me. She would do all the routine questions, but also was a nit picker on their clothing. She noticed one guys socks. She was willing to hire him only because he was a software engineer and they were considered odd to start. I asked one seemingly stupid question. He didn't flinch and gave me a straight up answer - the wrong answer.
I immediately turned off and had to explain my question later to the other manager. So answer honestly, don't try and BS. If you don't understand the question, ask. Other people did ask or put a question mark on the end of their answer, which led to a brief discussion and further questions. I wasn't looking for a hack. I wanted someone who had a logical mind, that addressed problems using a certain method.

Be clean, neat and on time (early) don't make them wait for you, but wait patiently if they are running behind.
Be prepared to answer questions about not only your experience and education, but about any gaps or really short tenure in a previous position. Also, why are you looking for a job, what attracted you to this employer. Do a little research before you go, know what they do.


Now for my take on job hopping and the reasons people do it. Consider what a good response might be if asked why

Not sure how old you are, but since I started working benefits have gone down and pay raises are just flat COLA.
Most of that is due to changes in the laws and fear of litigation. Employers can't or won't show preference to high performers because of those limitations.

Employers are willing to pay a new recruit more than a current employee because they need that persons talents, or perceive they do, salary is driven by market supply and demand. If you are a current employee there is a certain amount of "taken for granted".

But you also have people who's opinion of their ability far exceeds actual performance. They should probably be in sales because they lie so well.
The often job hop for both the salary increase and because their lack of ability has started to catch up to them.

There are reasons for a short stay. Company folded. One reason to do your homework is know the market and where your employer stands.
Nothing like leaving a job for a seemingly better position only to learn the company is going under and the reason they are hiring is to backfill the positions of people who are running out the door. Bad Fit. Having been around the block I have and friends have experienced taking a position that ends up not being what you were hired for. I was once hired to work on a specific contract, a project which was in my swim lane. The company thought they had won the contract and was staffing up and I was brought on board. After a few weeks they learned they had not won the contract. They kept me on, but in a position that was not challenging and with a supervisor that was out of their league. One friend was hired to replace a departing manager, only to find out after starting that he changed his mind and decided to stay. Where did that leave her?
Sometimes, usually early on in your career, you out grow jobs. There just aren't opportunities there for you to learn and grow.
If you are looking at a contractor support position to support a government activity, well contracts come and go, sometimes your employer will change but your desk does not.

Bottom line, be honest. Again, look the person in the eye and be honest about the reason.
 

NorthBeachPerso

Honorary SMIB
I'm older than you, by a fair amount.

Also, let's be honest a bit. The job market here, with all the government contractors who change jobs more often than high end call girls change their underwear, is somewhat abnormal compared to the rest of the US.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
I'm older than you, by a fair amount.

Also, let's be honest a bit. The job market here, with all the government contractors who change jobs more often than high end call girls change their underwear, is somewhat abnormal compared to the rest of the US.

:killingme
The average factory rat out here has at least two jobs a year.
 

NorthBeachPerso

Honorary SMIB
:killingme
The average factory rat out here has at least two jobs a year.
I remember you saying before that the factories where you are can't keep people. Most areas, especially rural ones, a steady factory job is the gold standard and is somewhat passed down to your children.
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
I remember you saying before that the factories where you are can't keep people. Most areas, especially rural ones, a steady factory job is the gold standard and is somewhat passed down to your children.
I am a big fan of Mike Rowe and his promotion of skilled trades. But I think there is a cultural change in this country, a lot of younger people don't want to "work", I don't care if it's an office job or what, they simply don't want to put in the hours and do their job.
Oh, they like getting paid and constantly feel they are under paid. But they don't want to put in the time and earn it.
I can see two factory jobs a year. They probably get fired for taking time off when they feel like.
I get yelled at for the opposite. Weekends, holidays, leave, if something comes up, I will handle the emergency. Benefits of having a company cellphone :rolleyes: But I will be the first to admit, I get paid damn well and I believe I earned that and continue to earn my salary (and bonuses).

The only time I have been unemployed since turning 16 was when I took 2 weeks off to relocate between jobs.
That was my decision, and even then I had an offer from a former employer for my services for a handsome fee.
But the fear of death by pissed off wife was greater than the 5 digit offer.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
I remember you saying before that the factories where you are can't keep people. Most areas, especially rural ones, a steady factory job is the gold standard and is somewhat passed down to your children.

Sure when good union jobs were still available, but workers demanded to much and along with other reasons they closed and moved elsewhere.

I hate to tell you in most places that lifestyle left a few decades ago.

Employers dont dont fire employees, employees fire themselves.
 

NorthBeachPerso

Honorary SMIB
I am a big fan of Mike Rowe and his promotion of skilled trades. But I think there is a cultural change in this country, a lot of younger people don't want to "work", I don't care if it's an office job or what, they simply don't want to put in the hours and do their job.
Oh, they like getting paid and constantly feel they are under paid. But they don't want to put in the time and earn it.
I can see two factory jobs a year. They probably get fired for taking time off when they feel like.
I get yelled at for the opposite. Weekends, holidays, leave, if something comes up, I will handle the emergency. Benefits of having a company cellphone :rolleyes: But I will be the first to admit, I get paid damn well and I believe I earned that and continue to earn my salary (and bonuses).

The only time I have been unemployed since turning 16 was when I took 2 weeks off to relocate between jobs.
That was my decision, and even then I had an offer from a former employer for my services for a handsome fee.
But the fear of death by pissed off wife was greater than the 5 digit offer.

It's not necessarily the kids but their parents. A combination of factors but the last thing a teacher ever mentions to a minority student is a trade school or job.

With White parents it's the same, you just don't get accused of racism and "counseled" by the Administration.

I had one kid years ago who really wanted to go to Vo-Tech for electrical. I wrote him a recommendation, a very, very positive one. Then Grandma, who had custody came in and let me know in no uncertain terms that her grandson was college bound, probably Georgetown, on an academic scholarship. Unfortunately this kid couldn't spell Bob even when you spotted him the Bs, which I mentioned.

Kid ended up doing poorly (summer school every year) with college prep course work and ended up graduating and going to PGCC for...................electrician apprentice training, which, of course, he had to pay for.
 

snowygirl

Active Member
To the original question, What are you looking for?

I'm going to repeat or rephrase some of what I've read, but as someone who has reviewed resumes and had to interview candidates here is my opinion:
In general, presentation. Cover letter and resume look "professional". Spelling and grammar are correct.. Use of acronyms is done properly. Don't try to impress me with alphabet soup. I have an acronyms finder linked because there are often multiple definitions for the same one.

The resume should be tailored to the job you are seeking. You want it to "pop" so it highlights those things the perspective employer is searching for.

There are a variety of formats. Some have you put education and awards first, other prefer to see experience from your most recent back.
Another "suggestion" is the length of the resume, some say no more than two pages. But that's going to depend on your age and relevance to the job you are applying for.

Again, be professional. Don't use cute paper or funky fonts. Use a standard type face in a size that is easy to read. Normal margins as well.

Remember, the cover letter and resume are to get you in the door for an in person interview.

IF YOU ARE FORTUNATE to get an interview, again, be professional.
Dress appropriate. Obviously I don't suggest wearing a suit and tie for an interview to be a truck driver. Just remember, there is causal and there is sloppy, I had this pear who would co-interview some of the people coming in with me. She would do all the routine questions, but also was a nit picker on their clothing. She noticed one guys socks. She was willing to hire him only because he was a software engineer and they were considered odd to start. I asked one seemingly stupid question. He didn't flinch and gave me a straight up answer - the wrong answer.
I immediately turned off and had to explain my question later to the other manager. So answer honestly, don't try and BS. If you don't understand the question, ask. Other people did ask or put a question mark on the end of their answer, which led to a brief discussion and further questions. I wasn't looking for a hack. I wanted someone who had a logical mind, that addressed problems using a certain method.

Be clean, neat and on time (early) don't make them wait for you, but wait patiently if they are running behind.
Be prepared to answer questions about not only your experience and education, but about any gaps or really short tenure in a previous position. Also, why are you looking for a job, what attracted you to this employer. Do a little research before you go, know what they do.


Now for my take on job hopping and the reasons people do it. Consider what a good response might be if asked why

Not sure how old you are, but since I started working benefits have gone down and pay raises are just flat COLA.
Most of that is due to changes in the laws and fear of litigation. Employers can't or won't show preference to high performers because of those limitations.

Employers are willing to pay a new recruit more than a current employee because they need that persons talents, or perceive they do, salary is driven by market supply and demand. If you are a current employee there is a certain amount of "taken for granted".

But you also have people who's opinion of their ability far exceeds actual performance. They should probably be in sales because they lie so well.
The often job hop for both the salary increase and because their lack of ability has started to catch up to them.

There are reasons for a short stay. Company folded. One reason to do your homework is know the market and where your employer stands.
Nothing like leaving a job for a seemingly better position only to learn the company is going under and the reason they are hiring is to backfill the positions of people who are running out the door. Bad Fit. Having been around the block I have and friends have experienced taking a position that ends up not being what you were hired for. I was once hired to work on a specific contract, a project which was in my swim lane. The company thought they had won the contract and was staffing up and I was brought on board. After a few weeks they learned they had not won the contract. They kept me on, but in a position that was not challenging and with a supervisor that was out of their league. One friend was hired to replace a departing manager, only to find out after starting that he changed his mind and decided to stay. Where did that leave her?
Sometimes, usually early on in your career, you out grow jobs. There just aren't opportunities there for you to learn and grow.
If you are looking at a contractor support position to support a government activity, well contracts come and go, sometimes your employer will change but your desk does not.

Bottom line, be honest. Again, look the person in the eye and be honest about the reason.
Thank you so much for all the great information. I’m 49 and going back to work after raising my kids and taking care of my husband before he passed. The last time I worked was in 2013.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Sure when good union jobs were still available, but workers demanded to much and along with other reasons they closed and moved elsewhere.

I hate to tell you in most places that lifestyle left a few decades ago.

Employers dont dont fire employees, employees fire themselves.
I found one of my dads union seniority list about a month ago when I was cleaning my mom's basement out. The list was from 2004, his last as union president. The guy in his shop with the most seniority started there in 1959 (dad was born in 1950 and started working there in 1987). The other guys kept busting that guys balls to retire, he didnt get much work done any more and they were starting layoffs.
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
Thank you so much for all the great information. I’m 49 and going back to work after raising my kids and taking care of my husband before he passed. The last time I worked was in 2013.
Bless you and good luck.
You are young compared to some on this forum. :)
My mother went back to work after 18 years of being retired. She had been an active duty Army Nurse (RN), an officer. But back when she got married (and pregnant with me), pregnancy forced her to retire. My two younger brothers were heading into their last 3 years of high school and she and my dad decided the extra income would come in handy.
 

FED_UP

Well-Known Member
I wasn’t sure where to put this, anyway. What do you as business owners look for in job applicants? I’m sure that background checks are done, but I’m wondering about things like how far back would an applicant put on the application as far as work they have done? And are references a must? What about their credit, does that influence you also? And what about if someone hasn’t worked since 2013?
Thank you for any and all responses you may have. If there is anything else I may have missed, that would be greatly appreciated.
Curious, are you willing to say what size would you like your number 1, or looking for something with more substance and longevity.
 
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