It's Trumps fault that Black women are fat. LMAO

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I seriously had to think about this for a moment.

Well played.

:buddies:
Many years ago - about 1990 - I was looking up obesity, race, sex and age.
I found that the most obese segment among women was - over 65 (age) black women.
The thinnest segment among men was - over 65 (age) black MEN.
I've never quite figured that out.
 
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Hijinx

Well-Known Member
Many years ago - about 1990 - I was looking up obesity, race, sex and age.
I found that the most obese segment among women was - over 65 (age) black women.
The thinnest segment among men was - over 65 (age) black MEN.
I've never quite figured that out.
Maybe Jack Spratt was a black man.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Maybe Jack Spratt was a black man.
Out of curiosity - I went back to look at more current stats - my above statements are mostly true except - Hispanics have overtaken everyone in each category. The data I looked at originally did not regard Hispanic or Asian as a separate category.

What didn't surprise me was that Asians tend to be less obese. What DID surprise me - a LITTLE - is that obesity trends somewhat in reverse to income and education. That, the more educated or wealthier you were, the less likely you were to be obese. Obviously this is a trend referring to groups as a whole - we all know educated and wealthy people who are obese. It's an observation made about populations consisting of tens of millions.

I was surprised because I didn't think there'd be a correlation at all. We know that people with less education or less money are more likely to eat less nutritious food. But they're every bit as likely to work at a job where they have to actually MOVE, more likely to do things for themselves than pay others to do it for them. So that surprised me, a little.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Actually, to add to part of my previous discussion - some years back, I was helping my wife research a paper on childhood obesity. I found a set of maps chronicling the problem across the United States, with darkest areas showing the highest levels, lightest, the smallest levels.

NOT surprisingly to me at the time - the highest levels of CHILDHOOD obesity were centered in the poor South - Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Arkansas, with mostly lightening areas around the tips and lightest areas in the regions furthest away, namely, the Pacific Coast, the MidAtlantic, Northern Plains and New England. It was almost - but not precisely - a dark area surrounded by increasingly light areas in direct proportion to DISTANCE. Strange.

Since obese children have a high tendency to become obese adults, who tend to raise obese children, I expected the dark areas to get worse over time. It did. As I layered the maps, the poor South got a little worse every year.

But I noticed something also that was strange. So did the regions around it. I know as a nation we've been getting fatter, but the pattern continued so after several years, the regions around the poor South were as dark as THEY were originally. If you watched it on continuous loop, it looked something like paint dropping on a spot and slowly filling up a lighter region, radiating out from one spot.

It occurred to me that something ELSE exactly resembles this pattern.

Disease. A virus. Any other pattern you track over time with a colored demographic map will show different kinds of patterns - gun violence - drug use - cellphone ownership - job growth - if you look at maps fluctuating while looking at these kinds of things, they don't show a single dramatic pattern. But this DID.

I'm not positing some conjecture that obesity is caused by disease. But it may play a factor. Many years ago, it was almost universally accepted that stomach ulcers were CAUSED by stress. No. They are exacerbated by stress. They are caused by a pathogen, which has been identified.

I still wonder this, because I've looked at data for other countries - and some of that pattern is starting. United Kingdom, for example.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
My personal observations confirm a link between obesity and income.

I also remember reading how children from wealthy families tended to be overweight when young then morph into height/weight appropriate adults while poor children tended to be just the opposite.
 
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