Crock pot

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
I cooked a chuck roast in my crock pot a couple weeks ago. On the bottom was baby carrots, quartered red potatoes, and big chunks of celery and onion, then the roast was placed on top of the veggies. I poured in a 'Beer for Breakfast Stout' (I knew I'd get rid of that beer somehow), and sprinkled on some salt, pepper, and garlic powder. I set it up the evening before I cooked it and let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. Had my other-half pull it out of the 'frige before he went to work and set the crock on low to cook away until I got home (cooked for about 7 hours).

That sounds really good. I do chuck roast the same way, but never thought to pour beer over it. I usually dump a can of Rotel on top.
 

NextJen

Raisin cane
PREMO Member
That sounds really good. I do chuck roast the same way, but never thought to pour beer over it. I usually dump a can of Rotel on top.

I forgot to mention that I also put in some fresh sliced white mushrooms. The juice in the pot from the beer and the meat drippings was awesome. I should have saved it to make gravy later when I was doing some mashed potatoes. For future crock pot roasts, I think I'll leave out the quartered potatoes in the crock and do a side of mashed potatoes so I don't waste any of that gravy!
 

jazz lady

~*~ Rara Avis ~*~
PREMO Member
Its not a chuck roast, but a london broil in the freezer, you think it would still work using your recipe? Hubby wants it for dinner on Sunday.

London Broil is actually not a cut of meat but the way it is cooked - marinated then broiled and finally sliced thin. But its meaning has morphed into implying a cut of meat and is used incorrectly to denote cuts from the top round:

London Broil: The name of the finished dish, not the cut of meat. Butchers will use the name London Broil for flank steak, top round steak or top blade steak.

As such used, it is a leaner piece of meat than the bottom round but still a fairly tough cut of beef. It should work fine in the recipe I posted.

http://www.geniuskitchen.com/about/beef-round-cuts-818
 

luvmygdaughters

Well-Known Member
Well, I decided to marinate the LB in soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, garlic, and liquid smoke. Sat for 24 hours in the fridge. Took it out of the marinade, coated it with coarse sea salt and coarse ground pepper, wrapped in foll, put on a 250 degree grill for 3 hours. It was delicious and juicy. Had baked potatoes and fresh squash with it. Highly recommend cooking it this way.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
For your consideration ...

I love that stuff.
That stuff, McCormick® Slow Cooker Hearty Beef Stew Seasoning Mix, is pretty much all MSG. With Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten Soy Protein and Wheat Gluten and Yeast Extract, all of which are a form of MSG. And Chicken Powder which is made with MSG. Basically the whole package of powder is MSG. IMHO, one is just adulterating what could be a very healthy and nutritious meal with man made chemicals designed solely to make foods additive so they'll be bought more often.

Just as a friendly public service announcement. To each their own, but good to know actionable information.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
For your consideration ...


That stuff, McCormick® Slow Cooker Hearty Beef Stew Seasoning Mix, is pretty much all MSG. With Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten Soy Protein and Wheat Gluten and Yeast Extract, all of which are a form of MSG. And Chicken Powder which is made with MSG. Basically the whole package of powder is MSG. IMHO, one is just adulterating what could be a very healthy and nutritious meal with man made chemicals designed solely to make foods additive so they'll be bought more often.

Just as a friendly public service announcement. To each their own, but good to know actionable information.
MSG is naturally occurring in many foods.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
For your consideration ...

MSG is naturally occurring in many foods.
No it is not, and however .... a large proportion of glutamates present in most natural foods are bound to other proteins, (aka the whole of the natural product). This results in a slow release of the substance that the body is well-equipped to handle. Most of the naturally-occurring glutamate in foods is bound to other amino acids.

No foods naturally contain MSG. MSG, and its analogs, is a chemical and a food additive. Glutamate, when found naturally occurring in food is called 'Bound glutamic acid/glutamate' and is processed in the body without problems unless you are sensitive to glutamate.

MSG - monosodium glutamate, a chemical, when broken down by the body becomes 'free-glutamate' or free glutamic acid - it is unbound - this means that the glutamate, or glutamic acid which is a natural neurotransmitter in the body, becomes an EXCESS to the bodily requirements. This causes an overexciting of brain neurons, which literally causes the death of brain cells, also known as an 'Excitotoxin', a scientific term coined by neurosurgeons such as Russell Blaylock.

So, no. No foods naturally contain the chemical MSG.

Think of it like this: Which is better for you? The whole apple, with all its fiber, helping to control, slows, the release of its sugars, which reduces the spiking of blood sugar. Or drinking apple juice that is absent that fiber, and is mostly apple flavored sugar water which will, and does, spike blood sugars?

So why add in an additional man made, analogous to MSG, chemicals, (excitotoxins), which will give far more quantities that your body can handle, and cause possible harm, than you would get from that found in natural foods, which don't cause any issues, unless one is naturally sensitive to that natural food containing glutamates?

10288267_10203559187121084_1019314429_o-2.jpg
 
Last edited:

Clem72

Well-Known Member
I forgot to mention that I also put in some fresh sliced white mushrooms. The juice in the pot from the beer and the meat drippings was awesome. I should have saved it to make gravy later when I was doing some mashed potatoes. For future crock pot roasts, I think I'll leave out the quartered potatoes in the crock and do a side of mashed potatoes so I don't waste any of that gravy!

Did you cut up and/or brown the roast? This is basically exactly the way I cook my stew (sans beer) in the pressure cooker. Same layering and all.
 

PJay

Well-Known Member
For your consideration ...


That stuff, McCormick® Slow Cooker Hearty Beef Stew Seasoning Mix, is pretty much all MSG. With Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten Soy Protein and Wheat Gluten and Yeast Extract, all of which are a form of MSG. And Chicken Powder which is made with MSG. Basically the whole package of powder is MSG. IMHO, one is just adulterating what could be a very healthy and nutritious meal with man made chemicals designed solely to make foods additive so they'll be bought more often.

Just as a friendly public service announcement. To each their own, but good to know actionable information.

🥴
 

PJay

Well-Known Member
For your consideration ...


That stuff, McCormick® Slow Cooker Hearty Beef Stew Seasoning Mix, is pretty much all MSG. With Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten Soy Protein and Wheat Gluten and Yeast Extract, all of which are a form of MSG. And Chicken Powder which is made with MSG. Basically the whole package of powder is MSG. IMHO, one is just adulterating what could be a very healthy and nutritious meal with man made chemicals designed solely to make foods additive so they'll be bought more often.

Just as a friendly public service announcement. To each their own, but good to know actionable information.

I make stew once or twice a year. Moderation is the secret.

Thank you for the "friendly public service announcement."

Do you eat? Do you have a recipe?
 

PJay

Well-Known Member
Slow Cooker Chicken

Boneless skinless chicken breast (about 1lb.)

1 can cream of celery soup

1 can cream of chicken soup

Dried minced onion (about 2-3 tbsp)

Chopped celery (about 2 stalks)

Poultry seasoning (about 1/2 tsp)

Put all ingredients in pot and cook on low all day.

I serve over rice.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
For your consideration ...

I make stew once or twice a year. Moderation is the secret.

Thank you for the "friendly public service announcement."

Do you eat? Do you have a recipe?
Sure I eat. I try to keep things simple though. Fatty steaks, (year round outside grilling), eggs with lots of butter, bacon, fish, vegatables, etc.. That's my recipe for eating. Though I do make my own Kimchi, which is loaded with vitamins and probiotics.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
For your consideration ...


No it is not, and however .... a large proportion of glutamates present in most natural foods are bound to other proteins, (aka the whole of the natural product). This results in a slow release of the substance that the body is well-equipped to handle. Most of the naturally-occurring glutamate in foods is bound to other amino acids.

No foods naturally contain MSG. MSG, and its analogs, is a chemical and a food additive. Glutamate, when found naturally occurring in food is called 'Bound glutamic acid/glutamate' and is processed in the body without problems unless you are sensitive to glutamate.

MSG - monosodium glutamate, a chemical, when broken down by the body becomes 'free-glutamate' or free glutamic acid - it is unbound - this means that the glutamate, or glutamic acid which is a natural neurotransmitter in the body, becomes an EXCESS to the bodily requirements. This causes an overexciting of brain neurons, which literally causes the death of brain cells, also known as an 'Excitotoxin', a scientific term coined by neurosurgeons such as Russell Blaylock.

So, no. No foods naturally contain the chemical MSG.

Think of it like this: Which is better for you? The whole apple, with all its fiber, helping to control, slows, the release of its sugars, which reduces the spiking of blood sugar. Or drinking apple juice that is absent that fiber, and is mostly apple flavored sugar water which will, and does, spike blood sugars?

So why add in an additional man made, analogous to MSG, chemicals, (excitotoxins), which will give far more quantities that your body can handle, and cause possible harm, than you would get from that found in natural foods, which don't cause any issues, unless one is naturally sensitive to that natural food containing glutamates?

10288267_10203559187121084_1019314429_o-2.jpg
The FDA disagrees with you.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
For your consideration ...

The FDA disagrees with you.
They say right there in the first paragraph .... "Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of the common amino acid glutamic acid. Glutamic acid is naturally present in our bodies, and in many foods and food additives."

What they don't tell you is that in nature, glutamic acid is attached to other amino acids, and that Monosodium glutamate IS NOT found in nature. They are using word play to intentionally confuse people.

Here they say, "For example, a historical dish in the Asian community is a glutamate-rich seaweed broth." Notice, they DID NOT say, 'For example, a historical dish in the Asian community is a Monosodium glutamate-rich seaweed broth.'

There is a huge difference between the two. But you can believe what you want. I stay away from the crap.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
For your consideration ...


They say right there in the first paragraph .... "Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of the common amino acid glutamic acid. Glutamic acid is naturally present in our bodies, and in many foods and food additives."

What they don't tell you is that in nature, glutamic acid is attached to other amino acids, and that Monosodium glutamate IS NOT found in nature. They are using word play to intentionally confuse people.

Here they say, "For example, a historical dish in the Asian community is a glutamate-rich seaweed broth." Notice, they DID NOT say, 'For example, a historical dish in the Asian community is a Monosodium glutamate-rich seaweed broth.'

There is a huge difference between the two. But you can believe what you want. I stay away from the crap.
Did you make it past the first paragraph? Paragraph 2, first sentence “MSG occurs naturally in many foods, such as tomatoes and cheeses”
 
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