Should felons get to vote?

Should felons be allowed to vote?

  • Yes

    Votes: 10 19.6%
  • No

    Votes: 37 72.5%
  • Depends on their crime(s)

    Votes: 4 7.8%

  • Total voters
    51

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
PREMO Member
Ad Free Experience
Patron
A felon, after completion of sentence, including any parole, probation and/or restitution should be able to petition the court, as an individual, for restoration of rights. However, I do not think the more serious felonies such as murder, rape (of a victim of any age), or similar be accorded the opportunity.
 

WingsOfGold

Well-Known Member
Absolutely. Once they have served their sentence and are back in society they should get all of their rights back, to include voting.
Nope, they didn't serve shiit, they paid no debt back to society, they were incarcerated. Felonies aren't speeding tickets.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
So the capital protesters are most likely going to be felons, do they deserve to lose their right to vote forever?
 

Rommey

Well-Known Member
If you prevent them from working any job, haven't you infringed on their rights?
I think a lot of employers have standards that they are allowed to use to determine if a person is suitable for a given job. The example of a convicted sexual offender would require a school to take the prudent steps of not hiring someone with that history. Another example would be if a financial institution decided to not hire someone convicted of embezzlement. Plenty of jobs require security clearances and even well qualified candidates might not be able to get a security clearance to do the job. At what point do you say "I'm not hiring an ex-convict regardless of the crime" or "I'm not hiring an ex-convict convicted of a specific crime"?
 

glhs837

Power with Control
I think a lot of employers have standards that they are allowed to use to determine if a person is suitable for a given job. The example of a convicted sexual offender would require a school to take the prudent steps of not hiring someone with that history. Another example would be if a financial institution decided to not hire someone convicted of embezzlement. Plenty of jobs require security clearances and even well qualified candidates might not be able to get a security clearance to do the job. At what point do you say "I'm not hiring an ex-convict regardless of the crime" or "I'm not hiring an ex-convict convicted of a specific crime"?
Note I said "any" job, not "some" jobs. Not allowing an embezzler work in a bank makes sense, but not allowing them to pick in an Amazon warehouse doesnt.
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
Nor is voting once you lost that right.
That would depend where the felon is and in some places the crime committed;

  1. In Maine and Vermont the right isn't suspended at all and they can vote from prison.
  2. In DC, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Utah the right to vote is automatically restored on release from prison.
  3. In California, Colorado, Connecticut and New York the right to vote is automatically restored after release and upon discharge from parole.
  4. In Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Virginia the right is automatically restored after completion of sentence, parole, and probation.
  5. In Alabama, Delaware, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming it depends on the type crime or an individual petition to regain the right.
  6. And in Iowa and Kentucky the right can only be restored by an individual petition.
 

WingsOfGold

Well-Known Member
That would depend where the felon is and in some places the crime committed;

  1. In Maine and Vermont the right isn't suspended at all and they can vote from prison.
  2. In DC, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Utah the right to vote is automatically restored on release from prison.
  3. In California, Colorado, Connecticut and New York the right to vote is automatically restored after release and upon discharge from parole.
  4. In Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Virginia the right is automatically restored after completion of sentence, parole, and probation.
  5. In Alabama, Delaware, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming it depends on the type crime or an individual petition to regain the right.
  6. And in Iowa and Kentucky the right can only be restored by an individual petition.
That is correct but how can a murderer or baby fvucker "pay" their debt to society? Giving that shiit the right to vote would only enhance their odds of an easier life, the will always vote for the Sanders or Hairyasses. Snuff the bastards for all I care but do it slowly and painfully.
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
That is correct but how can a murderer or baby fvucker "pay" their debt to society? Giving that shiit the right to vote would only enhance their odds of an easier life, the will always vote for the Sanders or Hairyasses. Snuff the bastards for all I care but do it slowly and painfully.
Don't get me wrong, I am all for life sentences and the death penalty for those deserving it. But if a jurisdiction releases someone back into society, then release them whole with all of their rights restored.
 

rmorse

Well-Known Member
Nope. Never. A felon forfeits his/her/xer right to participate. FOREVER. No guns, no votes, no full participation in our civic life post-conviction.

Don't water down felony offenses. Felonies are serious crimes and I still believe in the deterrent aspect of the legal system.
There are ways with current gun laws to accidentally commit a felony....
 
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