So When do the Masks Come Off?

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
If the damn sick people would just stay home for 2 weeks, wouldn't this whole problem go away?
Oddly enough - one of the most patently obvious and sensible statements I've seen - and I've seen it often.

Since it is not a hugely contagious disease - you'd think what we've been doing SHOULD have shut it down, shouldn't it?

It's been months.

I am sure it could be argued that the lockdowns haven't been 100% - but certainly they have been more restrictive than nothing - and what we STILL HAVE, in spite of it all, is deaths in nursing homes where the constraints are the MOST draconian.

I can only conclude a few things:

  1. One is - you realistically can't stop it at all. I am not seeing significant differences between comparable situations in mortality. It is getting out there.
  2. Another is - we're just over labelling COVID. My mom died with COVID - which, due to her isolation clearly was caught at one of her many trips to the hospital - but she did not DIE of COVID. She had seizures often, and had a pacemaker. She died of a heart attack.
Because it either follows what we've been told -

a) Can't live in air or sun for very long - not long on surfaces and
b) Has a hibernation period of about two weeks and
c) Persons do not appear to be able to carry or be re-infected once the body has anti-bodies
d) All of which points to a disease which is essentially rendered useless after two weeks of total quarantine.

Or - it's wrong. At least one if not all of those assumptions is wrong. Which says to me - we probably cannot contain it no matter what we do.

MILLIONS of positives and a fraction of THOSE leading to death spells - not extremely contagious and not dangerous to most people.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Oddly enough - one of the most patently obvious and sensible statements I've seen - and I've seen it often.

Since it is not a hugely contagious disease - you'd think what we've been doing SHOULD have shut it down, shouldn't it?

It's been months.

I am sure it could be argued that the lockdowns haven't been 100% - but certainly they have been more restrictive than nothing - and what we STILL HAVE, in spite of it all, is deaths in nursing homes where the constraints are the MOST draconian.

I can only conclude a few things:

  1. One is - you realistically can't stop it at all. I am not seeing significant differences between comparable situations in mortality. It is getting out there.
  2. Another is - we're just over labelling COVID. My mom died with COVID - which, due to her isolation clearly was caught at one of her many trips to the hospital - but she did not DIE of COVID. She had seizures often, and had a pacemaker. She died of a heart attack.
Because it either follows what we've been told -

a) Can't live in air or sun for very long - not long on surfaces and
b) Has a hibernation period of about two weeks and
c) Persons do not appear to be able to carry or be re-infected once the body has anti-bodies
d) All of which points to a disease which is essentially rendered useless after two weeks of total quarantine.

Or - it's wrong. At least one if not all of those assumptions is wrong. Which says to me - we probably cannot contain it no matter what we do.

MILLIONS of positives and a fraction of THOSE leading to death spells - not extremely contagious and not dangerous to most people.
C) has been shown to be incorrect, just like a cold, natural antibodies from having had it dissipate fairly quickly, however it is believed the body will know how to correctly respond and not over react.

Doctors have learned better how to treat the disease also. That was pretty quick, it took two decades to learn how to treat HIV.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
C) has been shown to be incorrect, just like a cold, natural antibodies from having had it dissipate fairly quickly, however it is believed the body will know how to correctly respond and not over react.
If THAT is the case, then it's like the body's response to opportunistic germs like pneumonia - which are always trying to attack the body but fail - until the immune system is weakened. And which makes almost all of us permanent carriers - unaffected but able to spread it.

THEN - the solution is, protect the vulnerable with the vaccine - but otherwise, we get on with our lives.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately humans have shown that they can not handle being adults. I still maintain the biggest fear is causing the infrastructure to fail, the incident on the USS Teddy Roosevelt was almost an infrastructure collapse due to the outbreak being concentrated among the reactor crew..

The toilet paper situation highlights this, imagine food was limited and then suddenly the lights go out, it would be an apocalyptic movie playing out.

When the rioting in Seattle started places everywhere enacted curfews, the base upped the gate guards etc, hell our footlocker put plywood up over their windows so nobody got any of those social justice Jordans.
 
Top