New Businesses Coming to Southern Maryland

This isn't aimed at you because you just moved here fairly recently, but that's what the people down here wanted in the beginning (I'm talking all three Counties). Then, once it happened, they looked around and asked "Who the #### allowed this to happen?". They got real pissed when people like me pointed out that it was them who did it.
There's definitely been a tradeoff. People don't want the growth but don't mind the cushy base desk job with great benefits. How many folks would be able to work for themselves and run an HVAC, plumbing or any trade/service business if not for the population boom. If not for the proximity to DC and base explosion, we may be dying the slow death like Crisfield or Pocomoke City seem to be going through. I agree they've overdone retail and done too much building up and down 235, but we aren't the only place doing it.
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
This isn't aimed at you because you just moved here fairly recently, but that's what the people down here wanted in the beginning (I'm talking all three Counties). Then, once it happened, they looked around and asked "Who the #### allowed this to happen?". They got real pissed when people like me pointed out that it was them who did it.
Speaking from my experiences...

People wanted stores locally that met their daily needs, and did so by providing quality and variety at a fair price.
Harvest Market was okay, except that you had perishable goods on the shelf after their expiration date, one day and item would be available, then the shelf would be empty for 3 months.
There was one type of bread available, white.

When there was no competition businesses got sloppy and employees got rather lazy and at times rude.

But don't blame it on what people said they wanted, that really didn't drive the growth. Jobs did, people moved here for the jobs that were opened when BRAC hit.
The multiplier effect took over because those people working on base had children and needed housing, medical care, etc. That created more local jobs.
And so forth. You also have to look at what has been going on in DC, PG and even Chuck Co. As areas become gentrified in the city, upscale neighborhoods sprout in PG, it forces the poor out, and they have migrated south and that ends in St. Mary's because you can't go further south.

Now with the population growth, businesses saw the need to move in. Well they were brought in by the families that own and run the county.
Those families grew wealthier selling off land for development and you can bet they made the land use rules fit their plans.
When developer X buys the parcel, they go out and sell space to retailers. So for the local family to make money on the deal they have to guarantee the developer his plans will be approved and he will get his permits.

Notice the people didn't vote yes or no on Lowes (just an example), nobody took a poll and asked if it was Applebees or Ruby Tuesday.

The pace of development was planned to spread out so that the land on the market (for home or business) would be limited.
There was collusion by those that ran county government and those that owned the land to force prices up by controlling the supply.
 

Bonehead

Well-Known Member
We tried Dos Amigos...mediocre, nothing new. Waste of effort on their part in my opinion. I sure had my hopes.
 

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
New Tenants for St. Mary's Marketplace

Klein Enterprises has let me know that they have just signed some tasty new tenants to the St. Mary's Marketplace. Tropical Smoothie Cafe and Cold Stone Creamery will be located in one of the out parcel buildings next to Panda Express. Cold Stone is Co-Branding their space with the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory which adds chocolates, confections and candy apples to their stores. Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory has locations world wide. This will be their first store in Southern Maryland. More tenants are working for St. Mary's Marketplace. Stay tuned!
https://shashoconsulting.blogspot.com/2018/07/new-tenants-for-st-marys-marketplace.html
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
New Tenants for St. Mary's Marketplace
I think of shops like that not as destination points, but as impulse buys. Who sits at home and goes, "Dang, I'd really like a big huge caramel apple right now," then drives somewhere to get it? Usually that's the sort of thing that sneaks up on you when you're doing the walky/shoppy/drinky thing at a real destination. City Dock in Annapolis, for example.

Is this going to be something better than another strip mall? I could see these specialty stores having a home in Leonardtown, especially down by the wharf where people are already going, but not a destination by itself.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Who sits at home and goes, "Dang, I'd really like a big huge caramel apple right now," then drives somewhere to get it? Usually that's the sort of thing that sneaks up on you when you're doing the walky/shoppy/drinky thing at a real destination. City Dock in Annapolis, for example.
And this was precisely why shopping MALLS were good - honestly, if you recall the several dozens of stores there, how many of them would you REALLY have made one special trip to go there?
BUT -- you would absolutely stop there pretty much every time you went.

And there's the serendipity aspect - you're wandering around and you suddenly notice something that catches your eye - kind of like I feel about BOOKSTORES as opposed to buying stuff online.
I remember once seeing "Master and Commander" on a bookshelf - and learning for the first time it was a WHOLE BOOK SERIES of *21* books.
I never would have known. I knew all about the apostolic fathers and their writings early in Christianity - but it was by sheer accident I learned that there's a whole
slew of early writings associated with the Eastern Orthodox church that are every bit as old.

I miss malls - and kiosks in the middle of the indoor area. I lament the loss of shopping malls.
 
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