Smoking, seriously

Larry Gude

Strung Out
In the year and a half since I quit smoking 2 packs of cigarettes a day, I've been sick more than I have probably in the whole rest of my life put together. Flu bug, bronchial, blah blah blah, one thing after another. I remember that when my mom quit smoking a thousand years ago, too, that she suddenly was always sick with some bug.

So how do you anti-smoking zealots explain that? Because this is not anecdotal, this is a true first-person account of my own health and what I have personally observed.
Your immune system was devastated from the years of nicotine dependency to combat bugs. The nicotine, a FABULOUS insecticide, germicide, cide-cide, was doing ALL the work so your immune system became afflicted. Retarded. Un-functioning. Now, your body is desperately trying to reboot and get the thing started back up. Your DNA is running in circles :jameo: as it searches the recesses and bowels to find and re-fire the engines of resistance. These things take time. Does a gerber grow over night? No. Does a romaine become a salad over the weekend? No. Did Kim's ass get THAT big in 18 months? Not possible.

So, be patient and be happy you have a wonderful guy cooking for you nutritious and healthy meals so that your ravaged systems may, albeit slowly, come back on line and do their duty. And, be happy that you have a fabulous ex sending you a care package, THE care package if I may be so :diva: that will, WILL mind you, provide you with virtually 18 months worth of magical nutrients and minerals and digested worm and nematode poo that you've been painfully lacking as the nicotine killed off ALL the beneficial and biologicals meant to save your ass, lo, all these many desolate years.

Glad you asked and you are welcome. :diva:
 

Larry Gude

Strung Out
Number is the average number of cigarettes smoked per year

1 Serbia 2924
2 Bulgaria 2,822
3 Greece 2,795
4 Russia 2,786
5 Moldova 2,479
6 Ukraine 2,401
7 Slovenia 2,360
8 Bosnia and Herzegovina 2,278
9 Belarus 2,266
10 Montenegro 2,157
11 Lebanon 2,139
12 Czech Republic 2,125
13 South Korea 1,958
14 Republic of Macedonia 1,934
15 Kazakhstan 1,934
16 Azerbaijan 1,877
17 Japan 1,841
18 Kuwait 1,812
19 Spain 1,757
20 Switzerland 1,722
21 China 1,711
22 Austria 1,650
23 Tunisia 1,628
24 Croatia 1,621
25 Armenia
26 Christyvrania 14,600

Fact checked.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Your immune system was devastated from the years of nicotine dependency to combat bugs. The nicotine, a FABULOUS insecticide, germicide, cide-cide, was doing ALL the work so your immune system became afflicted. Retarded. Un-functioning. Now, your body is desperately trying to reboot and get the thing started back up.
That's probably the best explanation I've heard so far. Saying only that my immune system was compromised by nicotine is dumb, considering that I was never sick when I smoked and now get buggies all the time. But to say that the nicotine was on the job so my immune system said, "...Yeah...too many cooks..." and went off to party and find itself, THAT makes more sense.

You should call Harvard and Johns Hopkins.
 

Larry Gude

Strung Out
That's probably the best explanation I've heard so far. Saying only that my immune system was compromised by nicotine is dumb, considering that I was never sick when I smoked and now get buggies all the time. But to say that the nicotine was on the job so my immune system said, "...Yeah...too many cooks..." and went off to party and find itself, THAT makes more sense.

You should call Harvard and Johns Hopkins.
Probably???? WTF?




:lmao:
 

Bann

Doris Day meets Lady Gaga
PREMO Member
In the year and a half since I quit smoking 2 packs of cigarettes a day, I've been sick more than I have probably in the whole rest of my life put together. Flu bug, bronchial, blah blah blah, one thing after another. I remember that when my mom quit smoking a thousand years ago, too, that she suddenly was always sick with some bug.

So how do you anti-smoking zealots explain that? Because this is not anecdotal, this is a true first-person account of my own health and what I have personally observed.

I didn't smoke that much a day, but I do remember that I got a lot of the bugs and bronchial crap that you're describing* when I quit in 2000. I decided the day I quit cold turkey that I would start exercising to counteract any possible weight gains. 15 years later and I do get an occasional sinus infection, but I have learned to keep that at bay so it won't turn into something bronchial and possibly pneumonia. (neti pot, prescription sinus spray, etc). I know it will get better for you in time, but I also have to say, I never smoked anything after I quit. No cigs and there weren't any e-cigs at that time. I have smoked nothing since July 1, 2000.

*I was SO TICKED that I quit smoking and started getting sick from all sorts of stuff! I remember doing some intrawebs research and found all the usual :blahblah: about it, but I found some other info that was the most informative I'd ever read. For the longest time I even had that link saved, but I cannot find it or the info on the internet any longer. It was a college study into Nicotine and the mechanisms of it in your brain, and a host of other information.
 
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Bann

Doris Day meets Lady Gaga
PREMO Member
When you smoke you kill the little tiny hair like cilia that line your throat, lungs, sinuses and Eustachian (sp?) tubes. they are killed or paralyzed and are eventually, if you smoke enough, replaced by damaged cells that may turn cancerous, hence the increased cancer risk in smokers. When you quit smoking the cells begin to regenerate where they haven't been completely damaged and can move a lot of mucus and phlegm around in your respiratory tract. This of course does leave you open to infection while everything is clearing out. Infections make you susceptible to compounding infections etc etc. add to that a rather active flu season and the psychological aspect of justifying a well ingrained habit and you get a recipe for a very common experience among people who quit. Nearly everyone I know who quit complains for awhile after they are sicker, fatter, sadder and more anxious or at least one of those. But it fades out and eventually I think you'll find your health is better overall. If nothing else, you are saving the cash.
:yay:
 

Bann

Doris Day meets Lady Gaga
PREMO Member
Your immune system was devastated from the years of nicotine dependency to combat bugs. The nicotine, a FABULOUS insecticide, germicide, cide-cide, was doing ALL the work so your immune system became afflicted. Retarded. Un-functioning. Now, your body is desperately trying to reboot and get the thing started back up. Your DNA is running in circles :jameo: as it searches the recesses and bowels to find and re-fire the engines of resistance. These things take time. Does a gerber grow over night? No. Does a romaine become a salad over the weekend? No. Did Kim's ass get THAT big in 18 months? Not possible.

So, be patient and be happy you have a wonderful guy cooking for you nutritious and healthy meals so that your ravaged systems may, albeit slowly, come back on line and do their duty. And, be happy that you have a fabulous ex sending you a care package, THE care package if I may be so :diva: that will, WILL mind you, provide you with virtually 18 months worth of magical nutrients and minerals and digested worm and nematode poo that you've been painfully lacking as the nicotine killed off ALL the beneficial and biologicals meant to save your ass, lo, all these many desolate years.

Glad you asked and you are welcome. :diva:
:high5: Good answer!!!

You'll be fabulous by 80. 85 tops. :lmao:
:lmao:
 

mitzi

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I have a machine that "packs" the filtered tubes (both 100s and Kings), I still call it rolling though. :biggrin: I've been doing it for just about four years and it saves a ton of money (almost all excise taxes) with two smokers. And they don't go out if you rest them for a few seconds in an ash tray.
They can get a bit messy sometimes but it's worth the savings. I honestly couldn't afford to pay the full price of them anymore, that's why I tried making my own.
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
They can get a bit messy sometimes but it's worth the savings. I honestly couldn't afford to pay the full price of them anymore, that's why I tried making my own.
I don't know what machine you use but mine isn't messy at all. I could pay the price but I'm not going to fund those seeking to ban them with the excise tax money. Not to mention that I enjoy the full flavored taste I get from them and I know they don't have the "fire-prevention" chemicals in them.
 

Midnightrider

Well-Known Member
Fwiw, the instant I quit 14 years ago I felt better and better every single breathe. :shrug:
same here. It took about 2 months for me to have a noticable improvement in breathing, but i did not have this "sick all the time" syndrome V is talking about
That's probably the best explanation I've heard so far. Saying only that my immune system was compromised by nicotine is dumb, considering that I was never sick when I smoked and now get buggies all the time. But to say that the nicotine was on the job so my immune system said, "...Yeah...too many cooks..." and went off to party and find itself, THAT makes more sense.

You should call Harvard and Johns Hopkins.
That could be the explanation, but i thought you still inhaled nicotine you just vaped it. If that is the case the nicotine is still there.

Now the tar, that could be the 'magic bullet'
 

Larry Gude

Strung Out
same here. It took about 2 months for me to have a noticable improvement in breathing, but i did not have this "sick all the time" syndrome V is talking about t'
It's why I quit; I reached the point where a DEEP breath tasted sooooooo good and felt better. I crushed a half pack and tossed and EVERY breath on was fantastic. Still is to this day. I even quit cigars some time ago. This is fortunate for me; I simply WANTED those deep breaths more, far more, than that satisfying drag. I GET people enjoying smoking. I used to LOVE it. And I think that is why it is so hard for so many; they don't really wanna quit. I WANTED to. Very, very easy.

:buddies:
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
That could be the explanation, but i thought you still inhaled nicotine you just vaped it. If that is the case the nicotine is still there.

Now the tar, that could be the 'magic bullet'
Or one of the other chemicals you get in cigs that you don't get in vaping. Formaldehyde? Who knows.

I never felt bad when I smoked like a Turk and I always had good breath - better lung power than many non-smokers, in fact. I didn't wake up hacking out a body part, or wheezing when I walked up a flight of stairs. When I ran at the gym, my legs would give out before my lungs would - Larry used to tease me that I'd smoke on the treadmill if they'd let me. Cutting dramatically back, there was no noticeable improvement in my health or respiratory function. No unicorns or rainbows, no nothing. Just that I wasn't kicking in all that money to MOM or Terry anymore, which was the only reason I quit in the first place.

Now that I'm out of the habit - and yes, peeps, it is a habit and not a true addiction - I see no reason to go back to it (plus Monello would have me killed if I did), but all these little coldies and sinusies and buggies are annoying.
 

Larry Gude

Strung Out
Or one of the other chemicals you get in cigs that you don't get in vaping. Formaldehyde? Who knows.

I never felt bad when I smoked like a Turk and I always had good breath - better lung power than many non-smokers, in fact. I didn't wake up hacking out a body part, or wheezing when I walked up a flight of stairs. .
Is you smokers cough gone?
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
I quit 5 years ago after smoking 2 packs a day for about 30 years. I've had the opposite experience, at least where any kind of lung/bronchial infections are involved. I used to get inflicted with some really bad cases and for several years now I've not had one. My "smokers cough" was pretty bad too..and it is finally all gone.
 
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