Electric Car News

glhs837

Power with Control
Not all, and i am pretty sure the Tesla nannyware can't be bypassed. Where a 1995 Crown Vic can still be used for drive bys any time.

Nope, not all. But I'll bet there are a lot more GMs that can be shut down than Teslas.

And yes, you can shut the car out of the network. Would take some work, but not a huge amount.



The real answer is that if you don't want a connected car, don't buy one. Like the fear of EMP, keep a points ignition manual everything car in the garage. The thing is, criminals doing drive bys are not using 60-70K vehicles to do them unless they are stolen. And Teslas are one of the hardest vehicles to steal.
 

Kyle

ULTRA-F###ING-MAGA!
PREMO Member
IMG_5028.jpeg
 

Kyle

ULTRA-F###ING-MAGA!
PREMO Member
Ignorant Peasant Doesn't Know How To Operate Tesla Door

SOLVANG, CA — A local uncultured peasant was unable to make it to work Monday because his Uber driver arrived in a brand-new Tesla Model 3 and he couldn't figure out how to open the door.

"What is this? The handle's in the door? What?" said the poor ignorant fool, later identified as Gene Wilkins. "Is this the devil's magic?"


 

DaSDGuy

Well-Known Member

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
But our resident lotus eater says they are cheaper


I would like to know why the cars keep burning out motors

Well now how many engine and trans rebuilds with a 1.2 million mile ICE have had


The cars that did a million miles - on one engine


Some are cheaters - engines have been rebuilt one or more times, never ' replaced '



This is the car I was looking for;


5. 1963 Volkswagen Beetle​

A 1963 Volkswagen Beetle in blue, parked at a car show, the Beetle is included  a million mile car


1963 Volkswagen Beetle | Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images


If there is one thing most million-mile cars have in common, it’s build quality. An exception here is the Volkswagen Beetle SoCal native Albert Klein bought for $1,900 in 1963. Sporting imitation leather seats and a $5 outside mirror as an option, this car was not made for the long haul. Klein was determined, however, and the L.A. Times reported he replaced the engine seven times on his way to the milestone he reached in 1987. The final count before the indestructible Bug’s retirement was 1.61 million miles.





1990 BMW 325i​

Not all million-mile cars were purchased by private individuals. In this case, it was by a company, and it had a very good reason for doing so. Back in 1990, American oil company Mobil 1 bought a then brand new BMW 325i for testing lubricants. The BMW was chosen because of its impressive 2.5-liter inline-six engine. It was the ideal motor for long-term testing. The company figured it'd be a fascinating experiment to see if the 325i could be driven a million miles. Turns out it could, but like we said this was an experiment.
The coupe never left the garage. It wasn't driven anywhere. Engineers placed it on a rolling road, think of it as a treadmill for cars, fitted it with a never-ending fuel tank, and stuck the throttle at 85 mph. Then they sat back and let it run for four years. Once it hit a million miles, mechanics took its engine apart piece by piece and discovered that overall wear and tear was negligible. The 325i's engine was still within factory specs for a new car.
 

Sneakers

Just sneakin' around....
I would like to know why the cars keep burning out motors
I have my suspicions that it's related to driving style. Electric motors are incredibly torque-y, and wouldn't be surprised if the motors aren't being abused with high power accels. Just because they can. Like having a high end super car. How many wind up off the road because the driver can't control themselves.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
I would like to know why the cars keep burning out motors

Well now how many engine and trans rebuilds with a 1.2 million mile ICE have had


The cars that did a million miles - on one engine


Some are cheaters - engines have been rebuilt one or more times, never ' replaced '



This is the car I was looking for;


5. 1963 Volkswagen Beetle​

A 1963 Volkswagen Beetle in blue, parked at a car show, the Beetle is included  a million mile car


1963 Volkswagen Beetle | Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images


If there is one thing most million-mile cars have in common, it’s build quality. An exception here is the Volkswagen Beetle SoCal native Albert Klein bought for $1,900 in 1963. Sporting imitation leather seats and a $5 outside mirror as an option, this car was not made for the long haul. Klein was determined, however, and the L.A. Times reported he replaced the engine seven times on his way to the milestone he reached in 1987. The final count before the indestructible Bug’s retirement was 1.61 million miles.





1990 BMW 325i​

Not all million-mile cars were purchased by private individuals. In this case, it was by a company, and it had a very good reason for doing so. Back in 1990, American oil company Mobil 1 bought a then brand new BMW 325i for testing lubricants. The BMW was chosen because of its impressive 2.5-liter inline-six engine. It was the ideal motor for long-term testing. The company figured it'd be a fascinating experiment to see if the 325i could be driven a million miles. Turns out it could, but like we said this was an experiment.
The coupe never left the garage. It wasn't driven anywhere. Engineers placed it on a rolling road, think of it as a treadmill for cars, fitted it with a never-ending fuel tank, and stuck the throttle at 85 mph. Then they sat back and let it run for four years. Once it hit a million miles, mechanics took its engine apart piece by piece and discovered that overall wear and tear was negligible. The 325i's engine was still within factory specs for a new car.
They didn't have to replace the tires or the treadmill belt?
 

Pete

Repete
Boy bought a Tesla 3 a few months ago. I was there in a trip and we went to the dealer with him. I was skeptical at first but it is an iPhone in the shape of a car. His employer has chargers in the parking lot and they charge $5 a week. Works for him.
 
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PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Boy bought a Tesla 3 a few months ago. I was there in a trio and we went to the dealer. I was skeptical at first but it is an iPhone isn the shape of a car. His employer has chargers in the parking lot and they charge $5 a week. Works for him.
That is a great deal there.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
I would like to know why the cars keep burning out motors

Well now how many engine and trans rebuilds with a 1.2 million mile ICE have had


The cars that did a million miles - on one engine


Some are cheaters - engines have been rebuilt one or more times, never ' replaced '



This is the car I was looking for;


5. 1963 Volkswagen Beetle​

A 1963 Volkswagen Beetle in blue, parked at a car show, the Beetle is included  a million mile car


1963 Volkswagen Beetle | Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images


If there is one thing most million-mile cars have in common, it’s build quality. An exception here is the Volkswagen Beetle SoCal native Albert Klein bought for $1,900 in 1963. Sporting imitation leather seats and a $5 outside mirror as an option, this car was not made for the long haul. Klein was determined, however, and the L.A. Times reported he replaced the engine seven times on his way to the milestone he reached in 1987. The final count before the indestructible Bug’s retirement was 1.61 million miles.





1990 BMW 325i​

Not all million-mile cars were purchased by private individuals. In this case, it was by a company, and it had a very good reason for doing so. Back in 1990, American oil company Mobil 1 bought a then brand new BMW 325i for testing lubricants. The BMW was chosen because of its impressive 2.5-liter inline-six engine. It was the ideal motor for long-term testing. The company figured it'd be a fascinating experiment to see if the 325i could be driven a million miles. Turns out it could, but like we said this was an experiment.
The coupe never left the garage. It wasn't driven anywhere. Engineers placed it on a rolling road, think of it as a treadmill for cars, fitted it with a never-ending fuel tank, and stuck the throttle at 85 mph. Then they sat back and let it run for four years. Once it hit a million miles, mechanics took its engine apart piece by piece and discovered that overall wear and tear was negligible. The 325i's engine was still within factory specs for a new car.
At 85 mph running 24/7 it would only take 14 months to hit 1 million miles, so they didn't "just leave it"
 

glhs837

Power with Control
I assume I'm the alleged lotus eater :) I never said the older Model S packs should last that long, or even 500k. I said the Model 3 and Model Y packs were designed to have that life. The newer Model Y 4680 structural pack is the one designed to go a million. 3 and Y bodies the same. So a 2014 Tesla is a bit different than a 2023 Tesla. They have learned a lot and unlike some makers, they rtoll what they know immediately into the cars. And at 300K a piece, the batteries owe nobody.

I don't care what ya'll say, I still love my EV. :neener:

Is it red by chance? Might have passed you on my way back home from Philly on the bike last night just south of Gate 2.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
I assume I'm the alleged lotus eater :) I never said the older Model S packs should last that long, or even 500k. I said the Model 3 and Model Y packs were designed to have that life. The newer Model Y 4680 structural pack is the one designed to go a million. 3 and Y bodies the same. So a 2014 Tesla is a bit different than a 2023 Tesla. They have learned a lot and unlike some makers, they rtoll what they know immediately into the cars. And at 300K a piece, the batteries owe nobody.



Is it red by chance? Might have passed you on my way back home from Philly on the bike last night just south of Gate 2.
I don't think the many miles is the problem, I think the packs that won't fare well are in cars that sometimes sit a few weeks without use, those are the ones that would worry me.
 

Sneakers

Just sneakin' around....
I don't think the many miles is the problem, I think the packs that won't fare well are in cars that sometimes sit a few weeks without use, those are the ones that would worry me.
Why? LiFePO4 batteries hold a charge for a long time with little to no degradation. They also have a BMS mode for long term storage.
 
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